What's going on in your shop?

Sean Jones

Well-Known Member
Any reason you went with AAA instead of Parks 50? Just curious.
Larrin Thomas posted a YouTube video on quenching oils. His suggestion was if you are going to get only one quenching oil to make it AAA because it covers the broadest spectrum of needs. Right now I don't make very many knives so it seems to be the logical choice. I may get Parks 50 later if I find a need for it.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
I had to go back and read Larrin's article again to be sure. Here is a copy 'n paste: "However, if you buy only one oil it should be a fast oil like Parks 50 so that you can quench the low hardenability steels. If the funds are really so tight that you are considering buying canola I would recommend getting the relatively inexpensive AAA instead."

BUT, I would take issue with that statement as it seems it would depend on which steels you used. If W2/W1/1095 or 1084/1075 or 80CRV2 steels I would expect Parks 50 to be the choice, but if 8670, CryForgeV, 5160, etc are used then I'd expect the AAA oil would be best. Also at times the difference between Canola and Parks 50 were less than 1 point Rc. Larrin did note in a post he heated all oils to 120 or so before quenching. Not sure why Parks 50 would require heating as datasheet says ambient is just fine.

All in all, Larrin did a GREAT article.
 

Sean Jones

Well-Known Member
I had to go back and read Larrin's article again to be sure. Here is a copy 'n paste: "However, if you buy only one oil it should be a fast oil like Parks 50 so that you can quench the low hardenability steels. If the funds are really so tight that you are considering buying canola I would recommend getting the relatively inexpensive AAA instead."

BUT, I would take issue with that statement as it seems it would depend on which steels you used. If W2/W1/1095 or 1084/1075 or 80CRV2 steels I would expect Parks 50 to be the choice, but if 8670, CryForgeV, 5160, etc are used then I'd expect the AAA oil would be best. Also at times the difference between Canola and Parks 50 were less than 1 point Rc. Larrin did note in a post he heated all oils to 120 or so before quenching. Not sure why Parks 50 would require heating as datasheet says ambient is just fine.

All in all, Larrin did a GREAT article.
Perhaps I misunderstood his Video. But I got the impression that Larrin didn't think much of Canola oil at all. In fact the second half of the quote would support that I'd think. And right now funds are tight. However I'll revisit his Video and see if I misinterpreted something.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
Perhaps I misunderstood his Video. But I got the impression that Larrin didn't think much of Canola oil at all. In fact the second half of the quote would support that I'd think. And right now funds are tight. However I'll revisit his Video and see if I misinterpreted something.
Larrin didn't really support Canola oil for quenching, but looking at some of the graphs he gave Canola didn't do all that bad. Of course it really depends on which steel is being quenched, and very important how thick the steel is. This chart is for 1084, but I find it very suspect since many folks (myself included) have used Canola and got well over 60 Rc in tests.

1628859755299.png

Here is the same steel in 1/8" thick showing the difference of thickness:
1628860110603.png
chart above and other quotes and charts are from Larrin's article here:

Here is a chart comparing Parks 50 to Canola for 01 steel:
1628859925136.png

This is getting too long for a post in this thread - I need to watch the full video. I've read the article 2 or 3 times. Just for the record, I did order 2 gallon of Parks 50 from Boss to replace my Canola quench oil. I'm only quenching 10XX and 15N20 steels in thin sections so it seemed Parks 50 was best for me. As you can see it really depends on which steels you use, perhaps AAA is the best Quench oil for your use.

One more chart from the article showing what steels for what quench:
1628860417836.png
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
I'm working on this today. My first hidden tang kitchen knife haha

It's been a bit of a challenge figuring out which steps to take when but it's coming together

i-h9LM82z-XL.jpg

i-gfXQ5M8-XL.jpg


It will be zero after hand rubbing, then I'll thicken it up to about .005" during sharpening. You probably can't tell but this is a slight convex grind, I used Carothers rubber belt backed platen to 400 grit
i-97qHK5m-XL.jpg



The dowel rod trick is nice, I used some locating pins as wrkk

i-HK4ThRR-XL.jpg
 

scherf68

Well-Known Member
I'm working on this today. My first hidden tang kitchen knife haha

It's been a bit of a challenge figuring out which steps to take when but it's coming together

i-h9LM82z-XL.jpg

i-gfXQ5M8-XL.jpg


It will be zero after hand rubbing, then I'll thicken it up to about .005" during sharpening. You probably can't tell but this is a slight convex grind, I used Carothers rubber belt backed platen to 400 grit
i-97qHK5m-XL.jpg



The dowel rod trick is nice, I used some locating pins as wrkk

i-HK4ThRR-XL.jpg
I still have not tried hidden tang, must attempt and learn from my mistakes.
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
Well today I got the S relief ground in

i-9xGv3W9-XL.jpg


Then hand rubbed (only one side so far lol) to 400 grit

i-Grn8SGx-XL.jpg


Then I epoxied the bolster /guard on before I realized that I would have to remove for blackening

i-WdfjDWs-XL.jpg

i-Ghw6tKS-XL.jpg

i-8SPDBnr-XL.jpg


Sanded the scales through to 1500 grit for a soft matte feel

i-dBrg6Xr-XL.jpg


And finally removed the bolster/guard and hammered the top section, satin finished the rim/chamfers, and blackened

i-7KMp7LK-XL.jpg
i-KNSsSmD-XL.jpg
 
Last edited:

Johan Nel

Well-Known Member
Well today I got the S relief ground in

i-9xGv3W9-XL.jpg


Then hand rubbed (only one side so far lol) to 400 grit

i-Grn8SGx-XL.jpg


Then I epoxied the bolster /guard on before I realized that I would have to remove for blackening

i-WdfjDWs-XL.jpg

i-Ghw6tKS-XL.jpg

i-8SPDBnr-XL.jpg


Sanded the scales through to 1500 grit for a soft matte feel

i-dBrg6Xr-XL.jpg


And finally removed the bolster/guard and hammered the top section, satin finished the rim/chamfers, and blackened

i-7KMp7LK-XL.jpg
i-KNSsSmD-XL.jpg
Execution of your work is extremely neat and crisp. It looks great.
 
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