Mobile 1

zbq

Well-Known Member
Frank and Calvin, I just noticed Frank said that he is going to "try the Windex again"

If you don't mind me asking, for what purpose are you guys using Windex?

My 1st guess would be the "water cuts" part of the equation, but it's just a guess.
 

Calvin Robinson

Moderator Christian Forum
Frank and Calvin, I just noticed Frank said that he is going to "try the Windex again"

If you don't mind me asking, for what purpose are you guys using Windex?

My 1st guess would be the "water cuts" part of the equation, but it's just a guess.

Wet dry paper is designed to be used wet for a reason, I think that reason is to keep the paper from clogging so you can get more use out of it. I mix Simpel Green with my water to lubricate a little and it also smells good. The smell of Simpel Green reminds me of my hot rodding days when I used it as a degreaser.
 

Frank Niro

KNIFE MAKER
Yes, well I try to keep learning and not refuse suggestions I ask for. A few people say windex does a good job at least to start. I keep a small spray bottle in the shop to clean my glasses with. I do have a cutting fluid called Jokisch which is like an oil and have used it. It's pretty good stuff but expensive.Frank
 

Calvin Robinson

Moderator Christian Forum
Yes, well I try to keep learning and not refuse suggestions I ask for. A few people say windex does a good job at least to start. I keep a small spray bottle in the shop to clean my glasses with. I do have a cutting fluid called Jokisch which is like an oil and have used it. It's pretty good stuff but expensive.Frank

I have jock itch to but only in the summertime:3:
 

McClellan Made Blades

Well-Known Member
This was is a great tip that was shared with us. Thanks again! I was recently sanding a blade for a friend and found another great fluid to use, CLP (cleaning lubricating protectant, we use this on all of our fire arms in the military). It's not as economical as Mobil 1, but it is what I had handy at the time (I seem to have alot of little bittles of this stuff lying around fir some reason).

I haven't heard the word CLP in so long, brought back BAD memories!!! So y'all still use that? What I hated about it is that you can clean your weapon for days and the armory would use a squirt bottle to "lubricate" it, then all the carbon in all the many cracks would leak out and it would make you fail inspection!!! It'll make you sick!!!

I've tried Simple Green, didn't see any results, Windex, nothing even WD-40, nothing has worked as good as Mobile 1!

Good to see ya here Murph, I've been wondering wher you were, where are you now? And has plans changed for you to go back to the Sandbox? Be good Bro', Rex
 

Mike Martinez

Well-Known Member
+1 on mineral oil... its cheap, easy to find, and I don't have to wear gloves when using it since its leaching into my skin doesn't frighten me as much as synthetics.
 
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zbq

Well-Known Member
I bought a quart of Mobile 1 10w30, a bottle of Simple Green and some Rynowet from Supergrit today. I got 120, 280, 400 and 600. I figure if the Simple Green doesn't work, I can use it to clean the Mobile 1 off of the blade.:3:

Im not going for a mirror finish so I thought 600 should get a decent satin finish.
I just bought 10 sheets of each grit, hopefully this will last for a few blades.
 

Calvin Robinson

Moderator Christian Forum
I bought a quart of Mobile 1 10w30, a bottle of Simple Green and some Rynowet from Supergrit today. I got 120, 280, 400 and 600. I figure if the Simple Green doesn't work, I can use it to clean the Mobile 1 off of the blade.:3:

Im not going for a mirror finish so I thought 600 should get a decent satin finish.
I just bought 10 sheets of each grit, hopefully this will last for a few blades.

Mix the Simpel Green, 4parts water,1part Simpel Green. That's the way I use it. I've never used Mobil 1 but the next time my grandson comes over to change the oil in his Scion Tc I'll get a little from him and give it a try, he uses 0-20.
 

zbq

Well-Known Member
I'm assuming you apply several drops or more to the blade prior to the beginning of sanding and then try to keep a decent amount on it by adding as it naturally runs around to the bottom of the blade. Correct Calvin?
 

Calvin Robinson

Moderator Christian Forum
I'm assuming you apply several drops or more to the blade prior to the beginning of sanding and then try to keep a decent amount on it by adding as it naturally runs around to the bottom of the blade. Correct Calvin?

I have a small container with the Simpel Green in it sitting by, this container has an opening big enough to dip the 2" square of sandpaper wrapped around a 1" sanding block. I dip the paper,block and all in the liquid and start sanding if I need more liquid before that piece of paper is worn out I re dip it or just dip my fingers and dab it on the blade. I hand rub a lot of D-2 blades and this solution (Simpel Green diluted 4 to 1 with water) cut my time to do this unpleasant job by 75% over dry sanding. I do intend to try the Mobil 1 to see how it works it may be even better!
 

zbq

Well-Known Member
Thanks Calvin. Greatly appreciated.
I'll be trying it out in a few days when I get that Rhynowet shipment in.
 

James Terrio

Well-Known Member
There's definitely a difference between cutting and polishing. Last night I finished cleaning up my mil-build knives (pre-HT) with 220 and plain water. I can't swear to it but it does seem to cut a little faster that way. Then I switched back to Mobil1 and 400 grit, and I still like the way it polishes. I'll continue to try different "lubes" at different grits and see how they work.

In the meantime, I've been using plain unscented food-grade mineral oil to protect carbon blades from rust for a couple years now. It doesn't stink, won't make you sick and doesn't eat up leather. I never thought to try it as a sanding helper!
 

rob45

Well-Known Member
There's definitely a difference between cutting and polishing. Last night I finished cleaning up my mil-build knives (pre-HT) with 220 and plain water. I can't swear to it but it does seem to cut a little faster that way. Then I switched back to Mobil1 and 400 grit, and I still like the way it polishes. I'll continue to try different "lubes" at different grits and see how they work.

In the meantime, I've been using plain unscented food-grade mineral oil to protect carbon blades from rust for a couple years now. It doesn't stink, won't make you sick and doesn't eat up leather. I never thought to try it as a sanding helper!

I completely agree there's a difference between cutting and polishing.

I must admit that it's been quite some time since I've comepletely hand sanded a blade, but I certainly remember what worked best whenever a customer brought a rough casting into the shop. Someone putting an intake manifold or a set of wheels or the like at your doorstep will certainly have you thinking about how you're gonna approach it.

We would start by using a greaseless compound on a buffing wheel. This is available in various grits from 80 up to 600. The wheel is initially prepped with a "glue", then the greaseless compound is applied to the wheel just like a regular buffing compound.
Essentially, you now have a very flexible abrasive capable of quick cutting. Better than J-weight paper on steroids, and instantly rechargeable.

Now consider the final stages for polishing. The buffing compounds have grease binders in various degrees.

Different purposes, different binders. I don't know about anyone else, but I'll apply the same concept to fluids used in hand sanding.
Am I wanting the swarf to get out of the way so the abrasive can do its job (cutting), or am I wanting to keep it in suspension?
If I'm removing larger amounts of material, I want that stuff out of the way. If I'm polishing, I want that stuff in suspension because it continues to be ground finer and finer, providing the polishing effect.

I'm making another chef's knife, and my daughter is gonna help me finish it. This is her first go at the finishing process, so she's gonna learn how to do a mirror polish by hand. It's at 220 out of HT, so we'll start there and work our way up.
Water, windex, etc. until we get to 400 (maybe even 600), then switch to oil. Might give the Mobil 1 a try, but I'm also sittin' on close to 10 gallons of lightweight food grade mineral oil. We'll see what happens.

Rob
 
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