This one might have been a little ambitious

Windom Armory

Active Member
Before I describe anything I know my photography is not great I'm working with a cell phone under my kitchen lights.
This is my second attempt at forging a knife might have been a little ambitious deciding to go with full distal taper and a tapered tang all in one shot. Knife is being ground for heat treat and eating my lunch.
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Windom Armory

Active Member
Thank you. After chasing tapers all morning finally have them about straight and balance where I want it before heat treat. Fingers crossed it all goes right from here20190211_145318.jpg
 
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Chris Railey

KNIFE MAKER
That is far more scientific than I get. I just balance it on my finger right at the finger well, you went all the way to the Sharpie. Your scales will add some weight to the back end so do not forget about that.
 

Windom Armory

Active Member
That is far more scientific than I get. I just balance it on my finger right at the finger well, you went all the way to the Sharpie. Your scales will add some weight to the back end so do not forget about that.
I'm trying to factor for that.
This blade is a direct result of your critique of my first blade and the desire to make a better blade than any person has ever made before.
 
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Chris Railey

KNIFE MAKER
I have seen people hold it in H2O or a wet towell but if you can I would drill holes pre-HT. Are you using a forge for HT?
 

Chris Railey

KNIFE MAKER
Keep pushing...you will pass me next week. That is not an easy grind to do so good for you because you are pushing. I made a mistake early on and starting taking orders for some more popular designs so I got in a creative rut early on that limited me trying things I wanted to learn. I am almost clear of orders now so I hope to start making more San-Mai and Damascus blades soon. My plan is to take an order here and there to pay for my belts but mostly make what I want to make and pray people like it enough to buy it.
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
If I pack blade in cold sand can I torch the tang to soften it enough for drilling post quench?
You could, but there’s no particular reason to unless you have some pressing need. You already tapered the tang.

It’s your knife, but my suggestion is to not be a slave to certain ideas like perfect balance. You aren’t making a kitchen knife or a throwing knife- so in all honesty who cares about the balance to that degree?
 

Windom Armory

Active Member
Keep pushing...you will pass me next week. That is not an easy grind to do so good for you because you are pushing. I made a mistake early on and starting taking orders for some more popular designs so I got in a creative rut early on that limited me trying things I wanted to learn. I am almost clear of orders now so I hope to start making more San-Mai and Damascus blades soon. My plan is to take an order here and there to pay for my belts but mostly make what I want to make and pray people like it enough to buy it.
I took up knife making as a way to unwind and hammer out some issues. In that I have no intention of ever taking orders. If what I make sells, awesome. If not many people I know will get some very almost pretty decent gifts.
 

Chris Railey

KNIFE MAKER
I'm using a pipe in my forge and a pid to monitor temps. Blade is 1084 so should be pretty straight forward.
Then either drill before you harden or just do not harden your handle area. I have spoken here about my ADD so I have gotten ahead of myself and hardened before I drill my holes but because I use a forge my handles are rarely hardened to where I cannot drill if needed.
 

Windom Armory

Active Member
20190211_202112.jpg20190211_202053.jpgAfter shutting down for time with my girls this evening, I think I have it ready for heat treat. Definitely have some flaws do be addressed post ht. Not sure if I'm gonna try to go plungless or just bring the lines back.
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
To answer your question, yes you can anneal the tang to drill holes. I'd definitely follow the above advice to avoid hardening the tang in the first place, but let's say you did and you needed to drill holes. You can chuck the blade up in vise and spot anneal where you want to drill by using a propane torch. You'll be amazed that you can turn one spot cherry red and the blade on the other side of the vise will be cool to the touch with a bare hand. The vise makes a great heat sink. If the blade does start getting warm you can spritz it with water.

A trick that Boss shared once is to chuck up bit backwards in your drill press and then "drill" the spot you want on the tang to anneal it, then flip the bit over and actually make the hole. I've never tried it, but Boss wouldn't share it were it not legit.
 
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