The Newell .45 cal front loader

Bruce Bump

Forum Owner-Moderator
A humble thankyou guys. This much fun is illegal in some countries. We are so blessed to live in the USA.

Here is the afternoons results. A pair of take down screw drivers complete with amber dyed stag handles to be included in the set.
Also trying to figure out the placement of all the pieces for the display box. I think this is the way it will be.





 

roughcountry

Well-Known Member
Bruce, thanks for taking all the time showing your work. I gotta say the pictures sure don't do this set justice.
I'll not forget the feel of this set in my hand and just how special they are.

It sure makes a guy up the try in his own work, Thanks again. Robin
 

Bruce Bump

Forum Owner-Moderator
I have the wooden interior almost finished now. Just need to flock it and its done. This set is going to Jim Coopers for photographs and to our more than patient, Gabe at long last.



 
J

J.McDonald Knives

Guest
That is going to look amazing when its finished Bruce. Great job with the box!!
 

Bruce Bump

Forum Owner-Moderator
The flocking is over and drying nicely. It takes about 24 hours for this stuff to dry and then I can turn it upside down and knock the excess flock fibers out.





 

12345678910

Well-Known Member

That is a nice box and I really like that type of clasp


This photo brings up a question I have for any good woodworkers who may be listening.

I have seen several boxes with this type of small hinge, I own a couple.

Quite often the hinges have come loose, for one only supported by those 4 tiny screws, and for another the ones I have seen may not have been installed straight, so the two hinges are fighting against each other and pulling against those screws and trying to strip them out from day one.

My only thought is a piano hinge, which by it's on nature solves those problems right away.
Is a piano type hinge "old enough"?
Of course on a curvy box like you have here, you can't do that.

Are there any other solutions, perhaps more "traditional" or older?


My next question is - when did Philips screws come into being?
Can they be assumed to be in the same era that this set looks like it's from, or do we have to use slot screws to be "correct"

...and I have been fooled by so called "brass finished" hinges and screws which are steel with some sort of zinc dichromate plating on that eventually peels off. I now check them with a magnet to ensure that they are really brass before buying them...PITA Shame on them for selling such stuff.
 
Last edited:

Phil Evans

Well-Known Member
Bruce I am always amazed by your work. Thank you for all of your pictures, tips, tutorials, WIP, they really a pleasure to look at and very helpful. Thanks for taking the time to post. Phil
 

Bruce Bump

Forum Owner-Moderator
That is a nice box and I really like that type of clasp


This photo brings up a question I have for any good woodworkers who may be listening.

I have seen several boxes with this type of small hinge, I own a couple.

Quite often the hinges have come loose, for one only supported by those 4 tiny screws, and for another the ones I have seen may not have been installed straight, so the two hinges are fighting against each other and pulling against those screws and trying to strip them out from day one.

My only thought is a piano hinge, which by it's on nature solves those problems right away.
Is a piano type hinge "old enough"?
Of course on a curvy box like you have here, you can't do that.

Are there any other solutions, perhaps more "traditional" or older?


My next question is - when did Philips screws come into being?
Can they be assumed to be in the same era that this set looks like it's from, or do we have to use slot screws to be "correct"

...and I have been fooled by so called "brass finished" hinges and screws which are steel with some sort of zinc dichromate plating on that eventually peels off. I now check them with a magnet to ensure that they are really brass before buying them...PITA Shame on them for selling such stuff.
The phillips screws may be ahead of their time for a old time set like this but I'm not changing them. The hinges are brass and have a stop built onto the back side of them. They are expensive cabinet quality as is the push button latch. This is a $300 box made by a professional furniture maker. The only thing I would do differently if somebody would pay enough is to make my own custom made hinges. Gun blued nickel damascus hinges and latch would be cool dont ya think?
 

Bruce Bump

Forum Owner-Moderator
Bruce I am always amazed by your work. Thank you for all of your pictures, tips, tutorials, WIP, they really a pleasure to look at and very helpful. Thanks for taking the time to post. Phil
Thanks very much Phil. It does take time but so far I'm enjoying it allot. I'm not sure I can keep this up forever though, I'm not getting ahead on my orders at all. I spent 30 years with a boss cracking the whip for me to work faster and make him more money, its just kinda nice to enjoy life at my ripe old age of 58.9 years old besides, Tracy said I can do anything I want on my forum. :bud:
 
J

J.McDonald Knives

Guest
Dang Bruce, love the job on the box. Starting to get sad that this is going to end soon but as they say, all good things must come to an end. You should think about making a BP pistol that you can carry on your side using shot instead of a single round ball. I just think that would be cool to see and you would take a break to do a project for yourself. Could also make a matching EDC knife to carry with it, or use the set when you go hunting or out in the field and use it as a snake gun. Just a few ideas for you bro.
 

Bruce Bump

Forum Owner-Moderator
Dang Bruce, love the job on the box. Starting to get sad that this is going to end soon but as they say, all good things must come to an end. You should think about making a BP pistol that you can carry on your side using shot instead of a single round ball. I just think that would be cool to see and you would take a break to do a project for yourself. Could also make a matching EDC knife to carry with it, or use the set when you go hunting or out in the field and use it as a snake gun. Just a few ideas for you bro.
A edc pistol would be so cool to have. Not many people carry a pistol around everyday that they made themselves. Do you remember the "Liberty" pistol/folder? It is an EDC in Paris France right now. He loves that little gun, dont know if he shoots it but he does carry it. I've been thinking about making a totally modern, almost futuristic pistol but making it a single shot muzzleloader. It would be driving a Corvette with a VW engine. :D
 

RAGUEL3

Well-Known Member
I've been thinking about making a totally modern, almost futuristic pistol but making it a single shot muzzleloader. It would be driving a Corvette with a VW engine. :D
You mean along the lines of the pistol handbuilt in the movie "In the Line of Fire" with C Eastwood, only in steel? That would be a true oddity, think Glock/ Springfield XD look, but muzzle loader,lol.
 

RAGUEL3

Well-Known Member
For Mr Sam,

Henry F Phillips invented both the screw and the driver that bear his name.
The Oregon businessman patented two versions of a fastening device for crosshead screws in 1934 and 1936.
Phillips intended the screw for use with automatic screwdrivers and marketed it for mass-production industries such as auto manufacturing.
The Phillips screw can be driven with more torque and holds better than slotted screws. The Phillips system is also self-centering.
If you press the tip of the screwdriver against the screw head, it takes only a little wiggling to seat it properly.
The speed with which Phillips screws can be used was crucial to the auto assembly line. In addition, Phillips screws are almost impossible to over screw, which was also very important for industry.

Phillips persuaded the American Screw Company to manufacture his screw design, and the company convinced General Motors to use the screw on the 1936 Cadillac.
By 1940, most American automakers used Phillips screws.
When the U.S. needed to crank out jeeps and tanks for World War II, Phillips screws were an essential component in the war effort.

Interestingly enough, Phillips was not the first to improve on the old slotted screw. In 1908, Canadian Peter L. Robertson invented a square-head screw.
The Robertson screw was the first recess-drive fastener that was practical for mass production.
It had all the advantages of the Phillips, but Robertson was unable to get it used by American industries. This screw is standard in Canada and is favored by woodworkers on both sides of the border.

---- We now return to Mannix, already in progress.lol
 

12345678910

Well-Known Member
For Mr Sam,

Henry F Phillips invented both the screw and the driver that bear his name.
The Oregon businessman patented two versions of a fastening device for crosshead screws in 1934 and 1936.
Phillips intended the screw for use with automatic screwdrivers and marketed it for mass-production industries such as auto manufacturing.
The Phillips screw can be driven with more torque and holds better than slotted screws. The Phillips system is also self-centering.
If you press the tip of the screwdriver against the screw head, it takes only a little wiggling to seat it properly.
The speed with which Phillips screws can be used was crucial to the auto assembly line. In addition, Phillips screws are almost impossible to over screw, which was also very important for industry.

Phillips persuaded the American Screw Company to manufacture his screw design, and the company convinced General Motors to use the screw on the 1936 Cadillac.
By 1940, most American automakers used Phillips screws.
When the U.S. needed to crank out jeeps and tanks for World War II, Phillips screws were an essential component in the war effort.

Interestingly enough, Phillips was not the first to improve on the old slotted screw. In 1908, Canadian Peter L. Robertson invented a square-head screw.
The Robertson screw was the first recess-drive fastener that was practical for mass production.
It had all the advantages of the Phillips, but Robertson was unable to get it used by American industries. This screw is standard in Canada and is favored by woodworkers on both sides of the border.

---- We now return to Mannix, already in progress.lol
Thanks for the info, being Canadian, I'm aware of the Robertson,
I'm surprised that it is that old though.
I really prefer it over the Philips, it has a better fit and slips less.
Now there seems to be a new standard with the combo head phillips and Robertson - I really appreciate that.

The modern Hex and Torx are great too.
 
Last edited:

12345678910

Well-Known Member
The Phillips screws may be ahead of their time for a old time set like this but I'm not changing them. The hinges are brass and have a stop built onto the back side of them. They are expensive cabinet quality as is the push button latch. This is a $300 box made by a professional furniture maker. The only thing I would do differently if somebody would pay enough is to make my own custom made hinges. Gun blued nickel damascus hinges and latch would be cool don't ya think?
I wasn't implying that you change them, only looking for some info from you , or the hundreds of people that peek in to see your goodies.

I have much more knowledge in metal work than wood and am really curious of there are other older, more traditional type hinges that would be in tune with this era.

I've read a bunch of fine furniture and box making books lately, but if they use hinges, they all seem to use the standard little modern hardware hinges.

If you did make hinges on a future project, it would be nice to match the silverish and blue colors of the gunwith an all silver/nickle and blue package.

If you were to make them, what hinge style would you use ?
 

12345678910

Well-Known Member
We love to see these WIP's because if wer can see it all layed out, it seems possible that we could all do it too,

In terms of the next project what's up your sleeve?

pepperbox? they have a romance that appeals to me...
revolver?

- the complexity of advancing and timing multi barrels or a cylinder is baffling, but I'm sure you could do it.
 
Top