simple ways to scribe the edge?

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
hello!!

anybody knows simple/cheap ways/tools to scribe the edge (taking into account the different thicknesses of stock)? so far i have been eyeballing it, and lets face it, thats terrible, for accuracy and the eyes!
thanks
 

murphda2

Super Moderator and KD Blade Show Boss
Try using dykem and then using a set of calipers. Measure the thickness of your blade, divide by 2 and then use the blade of you calipers to scribe center. This is only accurate for stock removal. Also be advised that unless you have carbide tipped calipers it will eventually do damage to them, but it works in a pinch.
 

Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
Drill bits! Spray layout dye and choose a drill bit one fractional size smaller than the thickness of the blade then just scribe the line by sliding the bit along the blade, flip the blade and repeat.
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
Murph, thats the problem i have no carbide tipped caliper, wanted to buy hight gauge with carbide tip but its super pricey, ones sold locally are 100+ with steel tip

Erratus, i saw that before but thought it wasnt good, but i guess its definitely better that eye balling!

Thanks guys
 

MoblMec

Well-Known Member
Calipers are cheap at places like Harbor freight I think my digital ones cost $17 and at that price I will just replace them when they ware out. Also I use a large black Sharpe to mark with.
MoblMec
 

Travis Fry

Well-Known Member
Way better than eyeballing! I have a fancy edge scribing tool, and end up using the drill bit trick at least half the time anyway, just because it's faster if I'm only doing one blade than setting up the scribe tool. The tool is faster if I'm doing several of the same thickness. Overall, there isn't a big difference; for me it's a matter of what takes the least amount of time.
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
thanks guys, i guess for now its drill bits!

btwi tried the caliper with steel tip twice, but that alone dulled the tip a bit
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
I have always just eye balled the center line.

Taking about half of what I want removed with each belt grit. First few were a little rough but I am going on 16 years and a average of 12-20 knives a month.

Have fun!

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
that seems promising. well i have a lot to learn anyway :)

the weird thing is i noticed i do the exact same mistakes in the exact same places in the few knives i ground so far!
 

DonL

Well-Known Member
I have a cheap set of stainless steel calipers from HF and I have a couple of those pricey scribe tools. I use either dykem or magic marker to color the edge. I've used the calipers on about a dozen knives so far and rarely use the pricey scribe tools. The calipers are just faster and just as accurate for me.
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
so far mostly i tried knives with files,, so using a caliper wasnt much an option, but when using with billets i had bit of trouble doing exactly right, couldnt go straight, any tips on that?

thanks
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
i use calipers and dykem. gotta remember, you only need to press hard enough to scratch off the dykem or magic marker. i have scribes made out of old cutting bits to reinforce the mark and actually scratch the steel. a handful of various thicknesses of shim stock works also.
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
thanks guys, i found this on FB few days ago, by a guy from Thailand called Numfly Puysaotong, i think its brilliant!

facebook_-1163815020.jpg

won't be hard to build, just need to find carbide to use for the tip!
 

FGYT

Well-Known Member
I did for a bit make some scribes up from Flat stock

if you do 1/4" blades then get a bit of 1/8" stock chisel grind it and harden dont temper or just barely to keep it hard as possible then just place on a flat surface with the edge at the top and use corners to scribe the edge.

if you want a tramline for full flat then just knock one corner down with a second bevel on the top side and scribe the knife once on each side

ATB

Duncan
 

Sticks

Well-Known Member
I use a height gage. I paid about $ 50.00 at Enco. (The least expensive will work fine for what we do.) I think its a must have item. Once you set it for the blade your working on, you can re-scribe the center line after the dye goes away from grinding, precisley and quickly). Calipers work OK but are not as accurate as a height gage and those with carbide tipped jaws are close to the same price as the height gage. Aluminum jawed calipers wear.

Jay
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
thanks Duncan

i've seen this with a flat file.

i think i saw someone did it with round file, he totates it to get desired hieght... actually i saw this in a video but not a file, im confused! either way i guess a round file could work also.

i think i have lots of ideas to work on now :D

thanks all!
 
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