Morland Picture Gallery

bladegrinder

Well-Known Member
That's a nice knife Dennis, and your leather work is awesome.
as for the coloring in the elk antler, I've seen the same thing in some elk I've had. the only thing I can figure is it might be the remains of some blood while the antlers were growing.
 

Dennis Morland

KNIFE MAKER
That's a nice knife Dennis, and your leather work is awesome.
as for the coloring in the elk antler, I've seen the same thing in some elk I've had. the only thing I can figure is it might be the remains of some blood while the antlers were growing.
That thought crossed my mind. Like a permanent bruise from going from velvet to hard bone antler. My other thought was some sort of reaction from rubbing trees, bushes, whatever when he stripped the velvet off his horns. It has me stumped...
 

Ember Knives

Well-Known Member
I have been working on this next knife for about six months. Do a little work, think about it, do a little work, think about it. I have finally finished it up. A buddy of mine helped to design this knife for himself. He is stoked about it being finished. I hope he likes his new mini-cleaver. Made from high carbon steel, copper liners, copper pins, copper inserts, ironwood, a nice hamon, lots of filing, and some Wickett & Craig leather. Pictures are better than words. Just take a look at this beauty.

















Hi Mr. Morland, I know this is an older post, but I am wanting to do pins in a knife like you did here and was wondering how you did it. All your pins look perfect. I'm guessing these are all peened pins in the blade, and that all the pin holes are countersunk? Would you mind sharing your process, as I usually end up with gaps in the material. I have peened a few times, but I don't seem to be improving much. I hope this is not hijacking your thread to much, thank you in advance!
 

Dennis Morland

KNIFE MAKER
Alden - My name is Dennis. Please call me Dennis. Mr. Morland is my father. ;)

The process that I used was fairly straight forward. 1) Make your drill press as perpendicular as possible. Try to get your holes as close to 90 degrees. The more perpendicular/square-the better. If you have access to a mill - even better. Use it to make your holes. 2) Use a sharp drill bit. You want straight clean holes. 3) If I remember correctly, I used copper for that cleaver. I cut the pins a bit long. I cleaned the pins by spinning them in my drill press and using 320 grit sandpaper. 4) I placed the cleaned pin in each hole and piened them with a small ball pien hammer. I did not countersink the pins. I did beat the snot out of each pin. 5) I sanded the pin flat to the blade.

Hope that helps you a bit.

Dennis
 

Chris Railey

KNIFE MAKER
First knife of 2020. African Blackwood bolsters, stabilized elm burl scales, copper pins, drummed dyed leather sheath with a little bit of edge braiding. Hopefully this year will be an awesome knife year!!!

























De-mo, I was wondering about how the belt loop is attached to the sheath I have not seen that before is there a function involved or is it just a cool way to make a loop?
 

Dennis Morland

KNIFE MAKER
Chris

I do not have any secrets. I had to look to find some pictures of the back side of my sheaths. I do not like the look of the fold over type sheaths for a belt loop. You see the inside flesh of the leather. Not a lot you can do with that side. By using a strap, and attaching them, you get the nicer looking outside of the leather. Stamp it, carve it, color it, make it look good. Pretty simple concept.









 

Owl

KNIFE MAKER
Your lacing and stitching look great.
I have always had some problems keeping my stitching holes lined up really straight, especially on the back side.
Lately I've been using an awl blade in my drill press, which seems to work a little better.
How do you do it?
 

Dennis Morland

KNIFE MAKER
Your lacing and stitching look great.
I have always had some problems keeping my stitching holes lined up really straight, especially on the back side.
Lately I've been using an awl blade in my drill press, which seems to work a little better.
How do you do it?
On stitching I have tried at least a dozen different procedures. I have settled into using a diamond shaped stitching punch. I have the cheap Tandy 2-4-8 hole punch. I like that it keeps the stitching straight.

With lacing I have tried blade punches, circle punches, and single hole punches. It just depends on the style and size of lacing technique.

No secrets and nothing too fancy.
 
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