Lanyard tubing - both on fixed and folders, need help

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
What do you guys use? I am wanting a source where I can get the lanyard tubing pictured below... this way the liners/scales can be removable. I know on fixed blades you can just epoxy tubing in, but i don't want to do this. I couldn't find anything on usa knife makers supply.

DSCF7147.JPG
 

Dwane Oliver

Well-Known Member
On knives , that I want the scales to be removable, I don't use a tube. just a hole in the scale and in the tang/liners.
I think the reason people put tubes in , is more for aesthetics than anything.

JMHO


Dwane
 

Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
It can be for aesthetics or for function such as when you want a light weight mechanical hold that wont ever come loose. I still epoxy the tube even when flaring them just to seal up an area where moisture or blood could soak in under it. In the stub tangs I am building the single flaired tube is just added insurance against the three pieces of the scales and added tang porting from delamination.
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
It can be for aesthetics or for function such as when you want a light weight mechanical hold that wont ever come loose. I still epoxy the tube even when flaring them just to seal up an area where moisture or blood could soak in under it. In the stub tangs I am building the single flaired tube is just added insurance against the three pieces of the scales and added tang porting from delamination.

Along with the reasons noted by Shane, a smooth flared lanyard tube won't put any undue stress or ridges that can fray your leather or paracord lanyard.
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
I actually don't need or want it to be flared... just straight. I want to use it in fixed blades so I can put removeable scales on it. I am having another knife maker make me about 25 out of aluminum to try out.
 

RickA

Well-Known Member
Hi Razor-Edge

I cant say I have ever seen tubing that looks like that in a store, but I dont think it should be too difficult to produce, either by turning down thick wall tubing in a lathe or by pressing a piece of thin tubing into a piece of thicker tubing. ie: press a piece of 6mm tubing, into a piece of 8mm tubing with 1mm wall thickness (ie: the inside diameter of the larger tube is 6mm).

I used a similar concept to make the small wheels for my grinder (much longer but the same concept) - I pressed 6mm dia stainless rod through 8mm dia (1mm wall thickness) stainless tubing until the stainless tubing was centered on the rod. I used my bench vice to press the rod through the tubing. It should be possible to do the same to make the "lanyard tubes" you want.
 
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