Fixed blade handles - need help

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
So I have looked around but can't find much informatoin (that's not on youtube as my work computer won't let me view videos there). I am getting ready to make my first knife and just got 2 slabs of green g10 (kind of translucent) from trugrit. Can anyone give me tips or point me in the right direction for doing attaching and grinding these on my fixed blade? Thanks!
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
First of all G-10 and carbon fiber are very nasty to grind on your lungs. Wear a good respirator..

First,
You want a slow setting 30 minute Epoxy, and then what kind of pins, Bolts or corbys are you going to use?
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
Thanks Rhino!

What would be easiest for the method of attaching the g10 to the blade? I was thinking some type of screw that I can set into the handle possibly, but is something else easier? It would be nice to have them removable if they ever need to be changed out... but whatever you suggest I will probably go with, you have a ton more experience than me!
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
I imagine something like this would be much more difficult... that's why I was going to go w/ something like a screw for my first one lol

on a side note: I have the 2x72 sander, but I don't have a drill press (I can borrow one though) and a band saw. What size band saw do you think I can get away with minimum? I would just need it for cutting the scales at first probably... I use an angle grinder to rough out the basic shape of the knife.

I am using the 3m respirator with the particulate cartridges on it (p100 i think).

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Kayakersteve

Well-Known Member
Most scales can be bought as a set, so band saw would be lower on priority list. The drill press is important to keep holes perfectly straight. Make sure the scales and tang are roughed up enough to give epoxy goos stickiness (?word!)
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
Most scales can be bought as a set, so band saw would be lower on priority list. The drill press is important to keep holes perfectly straight. Make sure the scales and tang are roughed up enough to give epoxy goos stickiness (?word!)

so you suggest using epoxy and not making them removable?

i have two slabs that are basically rectangular blocks... i wouldn't need a bandsaw for these then, correct? I could just sand them down to shape on my belt sander?

man... i need a dust collection system lol
 

Kayakersteve

Well-Known Member
Yes, I would epoxy them - Can use something a simple as brass or other steel rod for pins. Again rough them up so epoxy bonds better. The corbys, etc look cool but planning thickness comes into play so you dont grind away too much exposing inner threaded material.
 

Mudman

Well-Known Member
Another note on the respirator, keep it clean. I see too often, people leaving their masks out in the open when not in use. If any material dust wonders inside the mask, guess what? you just inhaled it. When my mask gets dirty, I remove the filters and rinse it off and air dry away from the shop. After it's dry, keep it in a plastic bag/ziploc.
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
one more thing... what epoxy do you guys recommend?

if you are careful, i would suggest JB Weld, it takes over 30 minutes to set, so you have lots of time to get stuff even.
for a first handle, i would suggest a blade made of ordinary steel and use pine for the handle. take your time and figure out everything you are going to have to do to have a good looking product. pine would be easy to sand and shape. like i said, figure out what is the best way for You to sand and shape a blade
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
Thanks Scott! I got the blank roughed out! I have to drill holes for the scales and then I can send it off for ht.

My grind lines are a little uneven.... This is because I had to actually slightly taper the flat part toward the tip because my angle grinder slipped when I was cutting it out and put a couple of gouges in it that I had to remove :-( still turned out well though!

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dereklee12

Well-Known Member
not sure if anyone covered this but use a flat surface and glue sand paper to it (I use A 12" marble tile from homedepot or lowes) Then you can sand the scales perfectly flat by rubbing them in a figure eight motion on the paper. with my first few I would look at the spine and I would find gaps and glue spots. almost all of the scales your going to get will have high and low spots you wont see until your done. I mark the bottom of the scale with a marker and do the figure eight until all of the markings are sanded off. its amazing how uneven scales can be, even g10. your pictures look good. keep it up and get ready when you finish your first your hooked!
 

Kayakersteve

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure brand most people use...I get mine at local hardware store. Remember to get 1/2 hour or longer set time so you can take your time. Per assemble it dry first to make sure everything fits before mixing.
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
I leave my scales and the portion of the tang that is going to be epoxied at 80-120 grit. G-Flex is the BEST 30 minute stuff I have found but the Devcon 30 min in the syringe tubes works fine as long as you leave the facing parts rough.

If you dig up the Glue Wars thread on here you can learn a lot. Also J.Doyle's help will take you far!

I really like your blade profile & bevel grind! Good indexing and relief for the other three fingers. I do drill all of my holes before I grind my bevels. Try that on the next one, if you can get your own drill press?
 
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Sargeant1215

Well-Known Member
The only thing I can say is what some one important to me to me you have to learn look I don't care what anyone say there first knives weren't perfect just think of the material as you would any other material as long as u take ur time with it and be u rough out ur game plan b4 just jumping in head first u will be just fine look Rome wasn't built in a day but I hear it was a thing of beauty and make sue that u counter sink the holes on ur scales of ur knife on both sides , inside where the epoxy will go so it will seat true to the tang and the outside make sure to just kiss the holes with the bit the reason for the outside to as well is to so when u pin ur pins out with a ball pin hammer I by the way all u with need is a 6-8 oz ball pin anything else is just over kill for real plus it just give the pin a place to expand out to once u pound the pins flat any way then just grind the excess off and the transition between the pin and handle with be completely flush that's a secret by the way
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
I leave my scales and the portion of the tang that is going to be epoxied at 80-120 grit. G-Flex is the BEST 30 minute stuff I have found but the Devcon 30 min in the syringe tubes works fine as long as you leave the facing parts rough.

If you dig up the Glue Wars thread on here you can learn a lot. Also J.Doyle's help will take you far!

I really like your blade profile & bevel grind! Good indexing and relief for the other three fingers. I do drill all of my holes before I grind my bevels. Try that on the next one, if you can get your own drill press?

Yeah, I ordered the Gflex last friday I believe it was =) Thanks for the recommendation!

Yeah I am planning on using the sandpaper on glass trick to make sure the scales are flat... do I need to do this with the knife itself as well? It is just flat-stock i got from NJ Baron, so it is flat allready, although I don't know if it is "bent" at all anywhere. I guess I could test it... One very helpful tip John pointed out was to take my drill press and make dimples all over the inside of the scale (kind of like a golf ball look) that way it will have something for the epoxy to recess into and grab. I will probably not be peening my pins as I don't see it as necessary due to advise from others. The epoxy should hold it just fine.

why do you drill your holes before the bevels? What difference does it make? I am curious now :D
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
not sure if anyone covered this but use a flat surface and glue sand paper to it (I use A 12" marble tile from homedepot or lowes) Then you can sand the scales perfectly flat by rubbing them in a figure eight motion on the paper. with my first few I would look at the spine and I would find gaps and glue spots. almost all of the scales your going to get will have high and low spots you wont see until your done. I mark the bottom of the scale with a marker and do the figure eight until all of the markings are sanded off. its amazing how uneven scales can be, even g10. your pictures look good. keep it up and get ready when you finish your first your hooked!

Thanks Derek... I will be doing this definitely! Esp. since I don't have a surface grinder.
 
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