Wakizashi Swords

jean21

New Member
I want an antique wakizashi swords in shirasaya for self-protection and many others. how can I tell if a sword is a dependable device vs. just a showpiece? priorities additionally consist of a low rate point, historic accuracy, and minimalist design in that order.
 

oldknife

Well-Known Member
I don't think I can give you all the answers you want, you could test a sword on a carcass the japanese did this at times. I have two japanese wakizashi they are in saya's one is signed and has a kozuka and signed menuki's, the other is not signed but has a great temper line, all so have a signed katona in a saya. If you have any interest in them send me your E-mail, I have pictures and know what the signatures are. Deane
 

Andre Grobler

Well-Known Member
I think for self defense a modern one would be both less expensive and more effective, and less of a problem if taken as evidence, since it will not be cared for properly, it will probably be destroyed by rust... and shirasaya is actually meant for storage, so wouldn't be all that useful. you might be looking for shikomizue, or aikuchi mounting maybe, if you wanted it to be somewhat concealed... I would tend to think mostly you would want modern steels, without differential hardening to maximise strength and therefor be able to make it thinner and lighter for the somewhat hidden purpose you want it.
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
It's been a while since one has been able to hand his sword over to a sword tester to see what kind of damage it could do to a condemned prisoner which, in ancient Japan, was just about any prisoner.

Poor attempts of levity aside, I'm a little at a loss to understand you desire to get an antique sword or self defense. I don't see the advantage over an antique cut centric cut and thrust sword of of any period of time or geographical location over a modern duplicate, though I do have to admit that I wish I had the income to allow me to collect Victorian constables' cutlasses.

Another question would be why do you think that you need to carry or keep a weapon to defend yourself with. I've lived in four states in my lifetime and all four outlaw the carrying of swords except for things like reenactments. If you did end up needing to defend yourself you a sword you might being outclassed by a firearm. If I were wanting something to protect myself with at home or one the street I would have to give one of those .45LC/.45ACP/.410 revolvers and load it with .410 buckshot. Of course, I'm not interdicted from owning a firearm where I'm at and all I would need to do is apply for my FOID card and a concealed carry permit.

Doug
 

Andre Grobler

Well-Known Member
It's been a while since one has been able to hand his sword over to a sword tester to see what kind of damage it could do to a condemned prisoner which, in ancient Japan, was just about any prisoner.

Poor attempts of levity aside, I'm a little at a loss to understand you desire to get an antique sword or self defense. I don't see the advantage over an antique cut centric cut and thrust sword of of any period of time or geographical location over a modern duplicate, though I do have to admit that I wish I had the income to allow me to collect Victorian constables' cutlasses.

Another question would be why do you think that you need to carry or keep a weapon to defend yourself with. I've lived in four states in my lifetime and all four outlaw the carrying of swords except for things like reenactments. If you did end up needing to defend yourself you a sword you might being outclassed by a firearm. If I were wanting something to protect myself with at home or one the street I would have to give one of those .45LC/.45ACP/.410 revolvers and load it with .410 buckshot. Of course, I'm not interdicted from owning a firearm where I'm at and all I would need to do is apply for my FOID card and a concealed carry permit.

Doug
because it is a sword... and waaaay coooler than any of the above
 
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