Stabilizing vacuum chamber

#1
My agent sent me an email this morning asking if I was interested in this giraffe bone. There is already 4 bones and 4 impala horns going to be sent but these bones are extras. I have set out to do two handles from the bone I have and in both cases one of the bones split with one when I drilled one of the pin holes and the other at the completion of cutting it to size so it looks like I am going to have to invest in a stabilising vacuum chamber
So the question is where do I find the chamber and the vacuum pump. There must be an outlet for them somewhere that one of you could point me toward. I have heard of guys using glass but have been advised that there is some type of acrylic that is used for the chamber to withstand the vacuum and is more resilient than glass. Some things I am prepared to potter round and make do but for this where there is a lot to be done I think I want to get something that is going to work without any head scratching from me.
Giraffe bone.png
 

IanF

Well-Known Member
#2
Since you’re in N’zed you might be better off looking at setting up with fowlers vacola preserving jars. Has worked well for me. I grabbed vacuum pump from eBay.
 
#4
Go to Amazon and look up “degasser” or “de-gasser” and you will find kits with pump and chamber. There is nothing special about the chamber it is normally a stainless steel chili pot. I got the “ablaze” kit and so far so good.
 

C Craft

Well-Known Member
#5
Von, here is a link to eBay and it will give you a pic and a idea of what is needed! https://www.ebay.com/itm/5-Gallon-S...h=item4896985f69:g:s8oAAOSwhY9cUMfj:rk:8:pf:0

Basically what everyone is telling you is correct! You can buy chambers made for the process. I think they may be a thick acrylic! The pot works well as you can use a small jar or similar container to sit in the bottom of the pot!! That keeps the mess out of the pot and as the vacuum is being pulled the jar is safe inside the pot because the vacuum is being pulled in and around the jar. So no risk of explosion/implosion!!

Check out this site as well and you can learn more about the process and what you need!! https://www.turntex.com/
 
#7
I made mine from a large old pressure cooker...I used a 3/4 thick piece of polycarbonate (for the lid) and cut an o-ring groove in it. Pipe tapped the top for a vacuum gage and air fitting. Works well.

I can fit 4or5 mason jars inside it.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
#9
I made mine from a large old pressure cooker...I used a 3/4 thick piece of polycarbonate (for the lid) and cut an o-ring groove in it. Pipe tapped the top for a vacuum gage and air fitting. Works well.

I can fit 4or5 mason jars inside it.
Now that is a good idea Red. I had thought about an old pressure cooker like that, but decided it held too much volume (resin) and didn't ever really do that much at a time. BUT - I didn't think about using smaller containers inside the pressure cooker pot. Good idea.
 

C Craft

Well-Known Member
#11
Now that is a good idea Red. I had thought about an old pressure cooker like that, but decided it held too much volume (resin) and didn't ever really do that much at a time. BUT - I didn't think about using smaller containers inside the pressure cooker pot. Good idea.
Basically what everyone is telling you is correct! You can buy chambers made for the process. I think they may be a thick acrylic! The pot works well as you can use a small jar or similar container to sit in the bottom of the pot!! That keeps the mess out of the pot and as the vacuum is being pulled the jar is safe inside the pot because the vacuum is being pulled in and around the jar. So no risk of explosion/implosion!!
I will say this Ken, it keeps most of the mess out of the pot and limits the amount of stabilization material as well. It will however send droplets of the stabilization material all over in the pot. You can wipe them up with a rag with a bit of acetone and keep your pot clean!!

Ken, I know you already know this but some others may not realize what is happening! Two things happen when you pull the vacuum. The stabilization material to boil, (that's why droplets will get on the inside of the pot), and the stabilization material builds heat. That is why if you set the jar aside for a soak and forget about it, ashamed.jpg for an extended period of time the stabilization will get hard. Heat is the catalyst for curing the stabilization material.

Set aside for a long period after pulling a vacuum, (I pulled a vacuum three different times on three consecutive days on the batch I screwed up and forgot for nearly 2 months) and the materials will harden on their own!!

When I found it, it had hardened on its own!! I called the guy from Turntex and he told me occasionally the stabilization material will harden on its own without a separate heat for cure. It is caused by the heat the materials go thru in the vacuum process!! That is why he ships the two materials to stabilize with in large quantities in separate containers. So as to not shorten the pot life of the material!!!

On the flip side if you do, over due the stabilization process and then set it aside for 2 months. You now have a jar with an (antler in my case), that makes a real nice paper weight!! f21f5487061e610ebf2dbff5121aa0df_384.png
 

C. Killgore

Well-Known Member
#12
I really like the look and feel of dyed/stabilized giraffe bone. One of my favorite materials.

One of the "features" of my stabilizing chamber is that is has an extra ball valve on it with a hose hooked on to it. The idea is that you would pull a vacuum on the piece before putting any stabilizing liquid inside. Then you put the hose in the bottom of the jug of stabilizer and open the valve. The vacuum pulls the stabilizer into the chamber. And you close it when you have enough and before it gets to air.

The maker of the chambers claimed it saved a lot of time sucking the air out by having it under vacuum prior to filling with stabilizer. I never did any comparisons to see for sure but all this talk of stabilizing makes me want to get back to it.
 
#13
When I was looking for the internal dimensions there is a Q&A lower on the page and this was posed
Question:
Is this compatible with a 240 volt power supply here in New Zealand?
Answer:
No it’s set up for 115v
By jray on July 10, 2018

It says the unit is 19.2lb and as shipping from the US to here costs me US$10/lb that is making it less cost effective so
I am looking to source a pump here in NZ but the chamber /clear acrylic lid I have not been able to find here
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
#14
........ One of the "features" of my stabilizing chamber is that is has an extra ball valve on it with a hose hooked on to it. The idea is that you would pull a vacuum on the piece before putting any stabilizing liquid inside. Then you put the hose in the bottom of the jug of stabilizer and open the valve. The vacuum pulls the stabilizer into the chamber. And you close it when you have enough and before it gets to air.

The maker of the chambers claimed it saved a lot of time sucking the air out by having it under vacuum prior to filling with stabilizer. I never did any comparisons to see for sure but all this talk of stabilizing makes me want to get back to it.
Interesting you mention that method - I was wondering about something like that earlier today. Some way to pull vacuum without resin in container to prevent foaming at start of vacuum pull. I was concerned about when the vacuum was released how much air would be pulled into wood before resin got there. With your method it might be ok.

Ken H>
 
Top