My Surface Grinder Attachment

One Armed

Well-Known Member
This is with the magnets epoxied in the Chuck Jeremy?
Another thing... I don’t use anything below a 120grit. And I go very shallow with cuts. Lastly, I move it very slow on the first cut. When feeling the resistance, the I go back & forth until I can’t hear it cutting. After several motions it seems like it’s no longer cutting. But if you can hear it it’s cutting.
 

gudspelr

Well-Known Member
Shoot-should’ve been more specific. I dressed the wheel with the rail assembly removed, so there wasn’t anything in the way. The 4’ long bar of steel was just standing on one end on the floor, with the other end pointing towards the ceiling. Put some sandpaper on the steel and gently push the bar into the turning wheel. Hope that all makes some more sense.

Jeremy
 

One Armed

Well-Known Member
I don’t believe dressing the wheel is really going to offer much benefit even in the best of circumstances. Which of course would be on a lathe. These are rubber wheels, typically around 70a duro. Even the much harder wheel I have now of 90a duro is nothing like a stone. Not to mention we are using soft backed belts. Every belt has probably several thous. play. The rubber wheel/belt method is not designed for ultimate precision. But it offers the custom Knifemaker all the precision needed for what we do. Think about it.... we can’t see or feel a .010” difference in thickness. Probably not even more. Our SGA’s are able to give many of us just over .001“-.002” in 6”-8” lengths. That is impressive. And plenty of precision for folders even.

Just my thoughts on the matter. If an individual’s SGA is showing unacceptable precision, I would look to other areas of play. The slide table, etc.
 

gudspelr

Well-Known Member
I can say without doubt that dressing my contact wheel helped significantly. It clearly wasn’t manufactured very precisely. By sighting over the top of it and spinning it by hand, I could see the rise and fall at the edges. I used a dial indicator and checked the hub and edge of the rubber wheel-both were very close to right on. Either the hole was drilled a bit off or the rubber was not applied consistently. The wheel left my steel a wedge, over .003 within only 1.25” along with some meaningful vibration and very noticeable washboard effect on the surface. After dressing, I got results of even across that same distance, less vibration, and less (but sadly, still noticeable) washboard on the surface. There was no way I was going to leave the wheel the way it was. I knew that if I couldn’t make it work better with my attempts at dressing the rubber on it, I’d have to buy a new one. So, I went for it and thankfully it helped.

Jeremy

I don’t believe dressing the wheel is really going to offer much benefit even in the best of circumstances. Which of course would be on a lathe. These are rubber wheels, typically around 70a duro. Even the much harder wheel I have now of 90a duro is nothing like a stone. Not to mention we are using soft backed belts. Every belt has probably several thous. play. The rubber wheel/belt method is not designed for ultimate precision. But it offers the custom Knifemaker all the precision needed for what we do. Think about it.... we can’t see or feel a .010” difference in thickness. Probably not even more. Our SGA’s are able to give many of us just over .001“-.002” in 6”-8” lengths. That is impressive. And plenty of precision for folders even.

Just my thoughts on the matter. If an individual’s SGA is showing unacceptable precision, I would look to other areas of play. The slide table, etc.
 

One Armed

Well-Known Member
Oh Jeremy, btw..... you had mentioned need to refresh your memory on choosing the thickness to taper your tang, right?

Easy way is to figure the taper you over 6”. Here is the technique shown by the man himself! I may have located parts affordable & figured out the mag Chuck... but this man’s brilliance was the beginning of it all! I simply reverse engineered what Travis came up with. Thanks again Travis!
 
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