My First Rough Cut Out Of 1080

Robert66

Well-Known Member
#5
I am glad you asked that.

I have been quenching 1095 in my ramshackle home made propane forge for a few knives so I assumed it would do the same for 1080.
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
#6
It will do. I hope you've learned to spot decalesence. It will help you determine if the steel has changed phases and is ready for the quench.

Doug
 

Robert66

Well-Known Member
#7
I hope this means decalesence.

Put knife in hot furnace until it gets to cherry red, take it out until it loses its colour a bit. put it back in until it again reaches cherry red, take it out again until it loses its redness, put it back again until it goes a couple of shades brighter make sure magnet will not stick to it and quech quick in canola oil for about 12 seconds.

Here is hoping. lol

Thanks.
 

Robert66

Well-Known Member
#8
I hope this means decalesence.

Put knife in hot furnace until it gets to cherry red, take it out until it loses its colour a bit. put it back in until it again reaches cherry red, take it out again until it loses its redness, put it back again until it goes a couple of shades brighter make sure magnet will not stick to it and quech quick in canola oil for about 12 seconds.

Here is hoping. lol

Thanks.
I have done the above and it is very hard to the file test butI am having difficulty obtaining a sharp blade.
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
#9
What you are looking for is a shadow to pass across the steel. As you heat the steel to around red to reddish-orange, depending on the ambient light and your eyesight, you will see a slight darkening in the steel like a shadow. This is caused by the energy that was causing some of the light in the steel to be used in the phase change (pearlite to austenite). Recalesence is the opposite reaction.

It is far more difficult to spot in bright light. Some will use a baffle tube in their forges. Some will only heat treat after dark or in a very dim interior (just make sure that you still have adequate ventilation) If you google it you may well find some videos on Youtube.

Doug
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
#11
A number of possibilities from a too course of a secondary bevel to large grain in the steel. With 1080 I would not expect to be having a problem with carbide growth.

Doug
 

Robert66

Well-Known Member
#13
I have been using a 1 x 30 belt sander for sharpening and sharpened 100s of 'ready made' knives with it EASY.

NOT SO with my own knives.

This one will not sharpen either.

PS just thought, is my BIG bevel steep enough???????????????????????



I am really fed up, will someone please give me a really sharp knife for my throat, lol lol lol .
 

C Craft

Well-Known Member
#15
1080 is usually not a problem but I could see where you might get a wire edge sharpening on a belt sander!!

I had that problem a while back although it was not 1080 it was CPMS30V! I would run it on a oil stone and it seemed never to be sharp like it should have been. I had to break out my magnifying glass after Ken H, and John Wilson suggested I had a wire edge. After seeing the edge under magnification I could then see the wire edge enough to be able to hang a nail on it!! Here is the thread if you want to take a look at it Robert! https://knifedogs.com/threads/pocket-knife-refuses-to-put-on-an-edge.47302/

Once I stropped it the wire edge was gone and it would slice like a new razor blade!! Till I stropped the edge all I was doing was rolling that wire edge from one side to the other, every time I tried to get rid of it!!
 
#16
I have a sneaking suspicion that your edges are thicker than you expect them to be. You are likely not getting to the cutting edge at all with your belt.

I have had exactly this problem. I would sharpen with no results until I thought I was crazy.

Worse yet is to have an edge with a single thick spot. You will get a razor edge all except for one area that will not cut butter.

I think you need to thin the edge drastically. Use your 1x30 and a course belt and cut a plainly visible 45 degree angle (edge up) on each side. When you can visibly see the zero-thickness edge, only then begin thinning each side of the edge.

If you try to sharpen a thick edge while edge-down, your belt will follow that fat curve and forever round off the cutting edge.
 
#17
This tool will restore your sanity. It is a wire thickness gauge. One side gives thicknesses in thousandths of an inch.

This tool will allow you to measure your edge thickness easily and accurately for both thickness and uniformity.

CA1BA42D-D765-460D-AD59-E190997D1765.jpeg
 
#18
Robert, are you getting a wire edge on your knives after you sharpen them on your 1 x 30 ?
and if so are you stropping or buffing the edge to remove it?
Thank you gentlemen.

I do buff on a 3500 rpm cloth wheel using compound at high speed as I have always done but DO NOT get a jagged wire burr to buff off as I normally do, I get a straight unbroken line which you can hang your coat on, that does buff out but does not give me sharpness.
Having read all your HELP it does look as if I have rounded the cutting edge which I will turn upside down to sharpen.

Thanks guys, will let you know if I have any hair left.

lol lol lol

I am off for a full medical health check this mornin on our NHS. don't know why, I have recently had one..
 
#19
Health check OK, hooray.

I have chopped off the new hardwood handle, put knife back in the jig and ground thinner bevels, I then freehand grind a small cutting bevel which will cut rope OK.
When I buff it goes blunt.

At no time does a wire edge show
 
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