D-2 Slipjoint

Axeman58

Active Member
#1
Does anyone have any info on tempering for the back spring on a D-2 Slipjoint you might be willing to share? I've worn the Internet out searching for any info, and am thus far finding nothing useful. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
#3
I have never worked with D-2 but a general HT would be heat to non magnetic, quench, remove scale to bare steel then use a low torch flame to slowly “run the colors” it will start light straw then darken to full blue. Go slow and turn the whole piece full blue. I start at the widest part of the spring and let the colors run toward the narrow end. I am sure there is a much more scientific process but that is what I would do.
 

Axeman58

Active Member
#4
Thanks guys. I think I'll try to find what the hardness would be around 1000-1100F. Chris, I would much rather use the HT oven I built to do the tempering in order to have more control over the spring temper. From all the information I have been able to find, D-2 does really well (as does most modern steels) with tight temperature control, and I've read that D-2 responds well to cyro treatment.
I think my original question may have been somewhat confusing because my wording doesn't really specify that I am interested in temperatures more than procedures. For that, I am sorry. Any way, even if I can't word my questions properly, I do appreciate you guys taking time to try to help.
 
#5
No worries Axe there is always more than one way to skin a cat. If Ihad a HT oven I would use it. My shop is set up more for blacksmithing than blade smithing. I usually will offer a simple (old school) suggestion because a lot of new smiths do not have ovens and pyrometers etc. Those things will help you squeeze the most out of a particular steel so they are a good thing but you can make a fine blade without them too.
 

Axeman58

Active Member
#6
No worries Axe there is always more than one way to skin a cat. If Ihad a HT oven I would use it. My shop is set up more for blacksmithing than blade smithing. I usually will offer a simple (old school) suggestion because a lot of new smiths do not have ovens and pyrometers etc. Those things will help you squeeze the most out of a particular steel so they are a good thing but you can make a fine blade without them too.
Chris,
I totally agree. It's the helping attitudes on this forum that keep me comin' back. I sincerely hope my reply did not offend you, I just thought I didn't give you guys all the information you might need in my original post.
Just as a matter of putting info out there, in my research last night, I discovered that D-2 has a secondary hardening curve in the 500F (?) range during tempering. It appears to me that I will need to do a 2X temper at 1150F in order to get the D-2 slipjoint spring into the recommended 45-48 HRC range. I sure hope a 60-62 HRC blade doesn't destroy the spring, but I have to believe the many slipjoint makers on this vital aspect of building a quality pocket knife. And, thank you again for taking time out of your life to try to help, I truly appreciate it.
 
#7
No offense at all Axe. I cannot help anyone with tempering steel in a HT oven because I have no experience there. There are many on this forum who can help there but there are many like me who still do simple HT and those I can help. I did not know which you were mainly because I am still new here...We are all on the same team.
 

stefand

Well-Known Member
#8
Here is my take on this matter....must just say, that I am no expert.
I would harden at 1020 deg C to 1040 deg C. Then temper the blade at 200 - 250 deg C. To get the spring down to 45 - 48 HRc, temper at 620 deg C, although I would aim for a slightly harder spring of about 50 - 55 HRc, at 550 deg C.
 

Axeman58

Active Member
#9
Here is my take on this matter....must just say, that I am no expert.
I would harden at 1020 deg C to 1040 deg C. Then temper the blade at 200 - 250 deg C. To get the spring down to 45 - 48 HRc, temper at 620 deg C, although I would aim for a slightly harder spring of about 50 - 55 HRc, at 550 deg C.
Thanks Stefand. From the look of your knives I've had the pleasure of seeing, I would have to object to your summation of being no expert. I can only hope I can someday to turn out folders as nice as yours.
 
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