BE2519 / 1.2519 / 110WCrV5 tool steel

samuraistuart

Well-Known Member
The Cr MAY slow the patina down A BIT, but we're talking only just about 1 point of Cr. And from what I understand, much if not all of that get's tied up as carbides and is not "free" Cr. Please don't quote me, tho, because there is vanadium and tungsten to tie up the carbon as well! Ken, funny you were asking about edge retention with 1.2519 and sharpening in the field. I totally agree....much prefer a slightly softer steel in the field that responds easier to quick touch-ups, if more often. Was just thinking about all of that earlier today. The Sandvik steels being VERY good at obtaining great edges, that last long, and are easy to touch up. I think 1.2519 would definitely be a bit more difficult to touch up an edge in the field, due to the tungsten carbides and vanadium carbides.
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
ok, here it is.
2519no1.jpg
2519no3.jpg
been finishing the edge today. 2am update, this stuff is harder than woodpecker lips. got new diamond stone just for this project. i purposely make blades with high hardness, at least Rc61. this is a kitchen knife for slicing veg and proteins on proper cutting boards, so after use and cleaning you touch up the edge with a stone. my big cleaver, 2 1/2"x8" 1084 Rc62-63, needs to be touched up on stone or belt about once every 4 or 5 months. This knife is probably going to be harder than most sharpening steels.
ain't no wonder steel. just something different and similar to what our brothers in the Eastern Coprosperity Sphere use in itsy bitsy pieces. handle is oak burl.
Scott
 
Last edited:

samuraistuart

Well-Known Member
That's a good looking nakiri! The wood is really something!! You ain't kidding about this stuff being harder than a chromed hitchball. I finally got around to grinding in the bevels of my petty, post heat treat. The temper was only 360F, with an austentizing temp of 1530F into Parks 50 oil. Needless to say.....it IS hard. I was able to grind in the majority of the bevels with a 36 grit belt, but had to switch to hand sanding before the edge got too hot. I am sanding lenthwise now, trying to erase the 36 grit with 80 grit.....and WOW this stuff does NOT want to be abraded! WAY harder than even Cru Forge V, which I found to be incredibly difficult to hand sand. I can tell this steel is going to be some good stuff, perfect for slicing applications. I received the 5mm x 50mm x 300mm in the mail the other day......still trying to decide on a blade shape. Will have to be a camp/hunting type knife, due to it's thickness. I am loving me some 1.2519.

Speaking of which, if anyone is interested in ordering 1.2519, a fellow in Germany will send it to you. He told me that he would love for me to spread the good word, so here it is......
Mr. Uwe Dostert www.der-kleine-messerladen.de/‎
Werkstatt/workshop:
Matthias-Erzberger-Str. 14b
D-56564 Neuwied
Phone: 0049 (0) 2631/ 9392422
Fax: 0049 (0) 2631/ 9392423
info@der-kleine-messerladen.de
Mobil/Cell : 0174/5161607
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
That's a good looking nakiri! The wood is really something!! You ain't kidding about this stuff being harder than a chromed hitchball. I finally got around to grinding in the bevels of my petty, post heat treat. The temper was only 360F, with an austentizing temp of 1530F into Parks 50 oil. Needless to say.....it IS hard. I was able to grind in the majority of the bevels with a 36 grit belt, but had to switch to hand sanding before the edge got too hot. I am sanding lenthwise now, trying to erase the 36 grit with 80 grit.....and WOW this stuff does NOT want to be abraded! WAY harder than even Cru Forge V, which I found to be incredibly difficult to hand sand. I can tell this steel is going to be some good stuff, perfect for slicing applications. I received the 5mm x 50mm x 300mm in the mail the other day......still trying to decide on a blade shape. Will have to be a camp/hunting type knife, due to it's thickness. I am loving me some 1.2519.
I joked with Roman on the other forum that I am calling the knife a "Deuschkiri."
what are you using for a grinder and belts? before heat treat i basically just broke the edge. after heat treat, i have been using 60 and 100 grit Norton Norzon zirconia on my 4x36 and 220 Norzon on my 2x72. Since we are using 1/16" material, i dont think you need much coarser than 60. i am using a brand new smith's fine(750grit) diamond stone to finish the edge. It is real close to done. When I am happy with the edge, i will do a passaround.
the handle is oak burl from my son's wood pile. it is finished with 4 coats of satin polyurethane.
 

samuraistuart

Well-Known Member
My grinder is just a Delta 4x36. The belts are the ceramic ones from Lowe's. I've been told, and after experimenting agree, since my machine runs at 2000sfpm, anything finer than 60 or 80 is going to get real hot, real fast. Even new fresh belts. I can get away with 36 grit to break in the bevels. Yes....with steel only 1/16" thick, cutting bevels on a petty utility knife doesn't take much.
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
My grinder is just a Delta 4x36. The belts are the ceramic ones from Lowe's. I've been told, and after experimenting agree, since my machine runs at 2000sfpm, anything finer than 60 or 80 is going to get real hot, real fast. Even new fresh belts. I can get away with 36 grit to break in the bevels. Yes....with steel only 1/16" thick, cutting bevels on a petty utility knife doesn't take much.
Call www.trugrit.com in Ontario Ca. They stock Norton and 3M Ceramic belts and I am darn sure these are better than the belts you are getting at Lowe's
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
my 4x36 is a little craftsman that run at 1100sfm. trugrit has a pretty good selection of belts, in addition to what rhino mentioned, they also have merit and klingspor SC to 600grit. if you google 4x36 norzon, you can sometimes find a bargin, norton norzon for me are the best compromise of wear and cost. it is a whole lot easier to get rid of 100 grit scratches than 36grit. also, norton norzon belts are waterproof so you can wet sand.
 

Jeremiah Rostig

Well-Known Member
Hey Jeremiah! So you're saying to be on the safe side, I should go ahead and do a few thermal cycles? I think I will, like you said, just to be sure. It is definitely good to know exactly what condition your steel is in, especially before hardening. My plan is to actually do three descending cycles, treating it much like I would spherodized 52100. 870C, cool to black. 815C, cool to black. 760C, cool to black. Then harden at your recommendation of 830C. I do have a question......what oil are you using to quench? A fast oil like Parks 50, or a bit slower oil, like 11 second oil, or canola? Thanks!
sorry, for the late reply.
I use normal vegetable cooking oil, I quench a piece of crab steel first to get the oil on temperature making more viscosity.There is no practical difference compared to specific industrial oils!I tried it and the performance of the blade is definitely the same!
The only difference that the steam of vegetable oils are not making cancer!
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
Sorry for not being back any sooner, but been off in "another world" (Archery and ham radio projects), and just tonight getting back to knifes. that steel sure sounds interesting, like it's gonna hold an edge forever!!! Of course, with 62Rc it better - hard to sharpen.

Scott, that's sure is purty oak burn on the handle - NICE. Don't you just love it when some "scrape" wood turns up looking that nice? I've got a set of scales from spalted pecan I stabilized with Cactus Juice that looks pretty good, and just waiting for a blade to put them on.

Ken H>
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
S
Scott, that's sure is purty oak burn on the handle - NICE. Don't you just love it when some "scrape" wood turns up looking that nice? I've got a set of scales from spalted pecan I stabilized with Cactus Juice that looks pretty good, and just waiting for a blade to put them on.

Ken H>
from a piece of wood that was in my son's woodpile. alot of the wood i use was found "at the curb". takes a while, but it is kinda fun to find a chunk of wood, let it dry for a year, then split it and see what is there. been finding spalted maple, dogwood root, hickory root, and oak.
scott
 

Smallshop

KNIFE MAKER
" been finding spalted maple, dogwood root, hickory root, and oak."

Very cool! Must feel like Christmas every time you split a chunk!

I just traded some machine work for some nice black walnut. Probably enough for 30-40 knife scales. It'll take me about 5 hrs to do the machine work.
 

samuraistuart

Well-Known Member
I finally completed the 1.2519 project!! I have yet to really test the steel out, but it looks and feels promising! I have a couple knives to show off to you guys (Scott thanks for your help!). The first is a camp knife of sorts....5mm thick tapered to tip / brought down to .010 edge before sharpening / walnut burl handles / 220 grit working finish. The second is a Japanese petty kitchen knife...1/16" thick tapered to tip / brought down to <.005" before sharpening / mesquite wood handles with black and white G10 liners / 600 grit finish (a little patina already from some fajitas!) Should have wiped it off better before photographing it. You can see some dirt/dust stuff on the blade. I hope ya'll like 'em!006.jpg016.jpg
I've been leaving the TruOil as a glossy finish, but I think I'm going to make it satin instead. Just use a bit of 0000 steel wool and TruOil, and wipe off the excess. Should make a nice satin look. Not too fond of the gloss. Doesn't photo well IMHO.
 
Last edited:

Smallshop

KNIFE MAKER
very nice. Hopefully you'll be able to tell us if the steel Scott recommended is all you both hoped it would be. Sounds like Jeremiah has had real good results with it.
 

samuraistuart

Well-Known Member
I am digging it quite well, Smallshop! The petty I made is just a laser thru food (geometry there), but the edge is just as sharp as it was on day one, and it has been through a bit of meat. Not the greatest test in the world, but I am liking it. Gives an awesome patina. have yet to put the camp knife thru it's paces. The vendor Schmiedeglut in Germany carries this steel and now has it in 2.5mm thickness.
 

Jeremiah Rostig

Well-Known Member
here is a link to a video made by the folks that sold me my steel. the conversation is in german, but i think if you watch you can get the point. pretty tough steel. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vr0uG7YiKO8 no, i am not going to try this with my completed knife.
I doubt whether this test, as it was executed is useful.....its about the edge not about the ability to deform/bending/breaking flat stock....in fact the whole workbench is hopping, eats all the impact .....but any how he would like to.
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
i had a much better demo of this steel during the weekend, should have taken photos. shaving nice long curls of oak and maple, scraping the wood smooth as silk, then slicing peaches, tomatoes, and cucumber see-thru thin. remarkable steel. next project is turning my remaining pieces of stock into blades.
 
Top