Asymmetrical Chisel Grind toughness test vid

Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
I made an Asymmetrical Chisel Ground blade to see how the design preformed and if the good and bad I had been warned and told abut were really true. I have been testing the blade for over a week 1/2 and have come to prefer the grind for what I desire in my hunting/ general bushcraft blades. Adding a secondary to the chisel on both side really just makes it an asymmetrical grind and prevents the blade from trying to "steer" when slicing firm vegetables such as potatoes and onions. The edge was taken to .004 before the secondaries was convexed on.

Specs for this drop point hunter are

O1 @ 62Rc
3 7/8 blade
4.5 handle
5/32 blade
1 1/8 at the widest part of the edge to spine

I made 7 videos attempting to condense the length from 10 minutes to the final just over 3. So the blade chopped buffalo horn and elk antler all seven times with no damage. Hope you enjoy and if you questions or comments please ask.

My HT equipment is advanced and design with accuracy and redundancy in accuracy as well as Industrial quenchants. Same for my tempering ovens. No hocus pocuss or the fables panther piss was used either :biggrin:

I would like to thank Keving Cashen, Ed Caffery, Darrin Sanders, Todd Yelverton Tracy and Beth for their time, patience, The forum and the knowledge that has allowed me to grow as a maker and craft such quality blades!

Thanks for watching

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Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
I did forget to mention it was Darrin that suggested chopping the elk antler to see how tough the blade was but after cutting so much of it it was getting too pithy for an honest test so i pulled out the buffalo horn.
 

Timy

Well-Known Member
Great video thank you for sharing! I love the odd grinds, like the chisel and the scandi and hollow. Thank you for taking the time to do this.
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
Shane,
My experence is that the steering/rolling of the blade in your hand come from having the flat of the chisel grind on the wrong side. You always want the flat side on the inside of the body. heence your 'tacitical" chisel grinds with the grind on the front side while holding in your right hand will roll when cutting by a right handed person. Thats a perfect setup for a lefty. So you may want to make both and inquire if the customer is right or left handed.

Nice little video. Isn't it great doing your own testing on these different grinds and edges! I have learned so much from it over the years and there is always more.
 

Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys! Laurence you are correct on the right and left handed grinds. I had some other parties stating they would steer or roll no matter the dominate hand but that just was not what I was seeing myself. Its not the end all be all but its a neat little grind that slices very well and does pretty good for wood projects too. More than anything I learned a lot about geometry, O1 and how well my heat treat practices are. It also gave many others non-knife people a chance to know why I am always in the shop working like a mad scientists mumbling strange metallurgic phases.

thanks again for everyone's guidance and time - shane
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
Shane,
There may still be slight rolling effect but when you have that in your right hand in a clockwise fashion that actually helps with a culinary knife having the slices roll off to your right and you are using it to advantage.
 
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