AEBL Warped by a pin hole

wall e

Well-Known Member
So I have discovered the importance of straight even pin holes.
On a knife I drilled a hole for the first pin and I accidentally partially removed some material, now there is a small warp in the same spot.
It is .110 thickness material.

Im of two minds but leaning twards the latter.
1. Use a felt liner and hide it
2. Try and straighten it up more or make the handle scales match up to the bow.
So Im asking for some advice about the right way to fix this.
 
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KenH

Well-Known Member
Use the 3-point method to temper (or retemper) to attempt straightening. A photo of warp would help with deciding.
 

wall e

Well-Known Member








Like it shows in the two pics with the vise and the scales it is a small slight warp but enough to notice when the scales are set on it.
I know it is a occasional problem and a small issue for the established/experienced maker to fix but it just seems to be a bur under my saddle to me. [emoji53] [emoji53] [emoji35] [emoji35] [emoji35] [emoji35] [emoji35]
I have a toaster oven that I could try and temper in but am wary it will not work.
 

wall e

Well-Known Member


This is where I see it warped at the pin hole.
When I first sought the wisdom of the knifemaking sages I was cautioned this could happen.
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
I would grind it flat, or mark a centerline and grind to it. It's likely to snap if you try to straighten it. It isn't warped that bad. I've broken two that would easily have ground flat.
 

wall e

Well-Known Member
To be honest I only have a small vise currently so it will be hard or atleast a challenge to try and straighten it using the vise. Grinding it flat will thin it down the knife as whole. But then it will match the other one that had to be thinned due to grinding error.
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
You don't have to completely flatten the whole thing. You may have to knock off the high spots in the handle area to get the scales to lay flat, but so what. Once the handle is pretty flat, mark your centerline. The trick is lay the blank on the side where it mill rock the least when you mark the centerline. Normally, you'd flip the blank over and mark center from the other side, too. Don't do that on this one because you aren't after the absolute center. You just need a straight line to grind everything to from each side.

A black liner with black epoxy does wonders for hiding teeny gaps in the handle area where there is some slight bow in the blade.

Dollars to donuts it comes out looking pretty doggone straight.
 
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wall e

Well-Known Member
Am pondering on trying a purple felt liner on this one it would hide the small amount I may not get mabbe.
 

wall e

Well-Known Member
So for smirks an giggles I put the liner in place and it visually is gone.
This is a gift knife for a friends wife and the function over powers cosmetics/astetics to them.
Is this a structural issue or a minor cosmetetic and fit issue?
 

BrandantR

Well-Known Member
Little things like this keep us on our toes and make things interesting. Some of my best knives were the product of overcoming challenges or mistakes. Step back and take a hard look at it and a good solution may just present itself. If you're going to try grinding it down, it might be a good candidate to try making a tapered tang. Whatever you decide, Walt, I'm sure it will work out.
 

wall e

Well-Known Member
https://vimeo.com/184157067

And its all smoothed and pretty. Staring up the grits to finish the handle.
Is monkey pod wood for the scales. Any special advice on finishing it? I plan to use true oil to seal it up to be on the safe side.
 
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