10XX steel chart

#1
[TABLE="class: grid, width: 500, align: left"]
[TR]
[TD]SAE #[/TD]
[TD]Carbon[/TD]
[TD]Manganese[/TD]
[TD]Phosphorus[/TD]
[TD]Silicon[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]1050[/TD]
[TD]0.47-0.55[/TD]
[TD]0.60-0.90[/TD]
[TD]0.40[/TD]
[TD]0.50[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]1065[/TD]
[TD]0.59-0.70[/TD]
[TD]0.60-0.90[/TD]
[TD]0.40[/TD]
[TD]0.50[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]1075[/TD]
[TD]0.69-0.80[/TD]
[TD]0.40-0.70[/TD]
[TD]0.40[/TD]
[TD]0.50[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]1084[/TD]
[TD]0.80-0.94[/TD]
[TD]0.70-1.00[/TD]
[TD]0.40[/TD]
[TD]0.50[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]1095[/TD]
[TD]0.90-1.04[/TD]
[TD]0.30-0.50[/TD]
[TD]0.40[/TD]
[TD]0.50[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]

10XX steels are basic carbon steels. Basically they only consist of Iron, Carbon, Manganese, Phosphorus, & Silicon. However, there may be other elements added, especially from Aldo, so this chart is mainly for basic comparison. The main difference is the carbon content which is designated by the last 2 numbers. There are many other 10XX series steels but these are the ones mainly used by knifemakers so I didn't list them all. Just remember that if you come across some 10XX steel that it will make a knife as long as the Carbon level is 0.50 or higher.
 
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