10v Hunter

Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
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CPM 10v 4" stubtang hunter with G10 frame and tang. FFG with distal taper starting at .145, Rc 64 8.25 OAL. Ti throng and lanyard bead.

Light strong wear resistant. Because its wear resistance is so extreme getting a polished finish is not economically viable.

I drew a strong influence from Phil Wilson on this steel and construction but wanted to make it my own and am pretty happy with it. What do yall think?
 
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Jeremiah Rostig

Well-Known Member
Nice hunter!...with good distal taper on the blade!
I feel free to tell my experience with CPM 10 V ...
I have a blade of this steel on the work bench, and I am disappointed a little bit(no, actually a lot...).I tested it with cutting sisal, whacking in giraffe bone and hardwood roots, and it performed simply boring bad.
compared to the higher costs of buying, working and heat treatment, this steel makes no better blade.
it is not half the way wear resistant than 2519, 2550, 2552, 2516 and 2442 but sharpens lousy difficult. it chips like a stainless in big carbide nicks and not getting an even dull blade like low alloy tool steels.....and it rusts like hell!!!..much more than the aforementioned steels.
I let the blade finish itself, means here in tropical enviroment, marks from grit 150 dissapered by corrosion...
On the other side high alloy steels
have a big individuality, for example: i had superb high alloy blades and out of the same billet, same heat treating, and real bad ones.
this was the last one of the cpms I tested
so evreything is relative means I only have the experience of this one blade....but I will not waste time in another.
no offence, I am just sharing my experience on this steel....
keep up the good work!
 
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Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
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What Rc and geometry were you using? If you have it too hard and too thin it will simple fracture away quickly. With the above blade and geometry matching the Rc it is preforming very well and has surpassed the steels I have used in the past for hunters. The steel was developed to have extreme wear resistance for cutting applications reducing the down time in factories. If it were not so or if it were not good for what its for then it would not have been in use 40+ years i would guess. Maybe your thermocouples are off or the heat treat was just botched, the blade may have gotten too hot when finish grinding or as I mentioned above the geometry did not match the Rc. I use silicon carbide stones and it sharpens up pretty quick for me and leaves it will a nice toothy edge. I am happy with it thus far and will have several more this week of differnt Rc to compare too. Here is one more as well and my personal user.
 

Timy

Well-Known Member
Beautiful knife man. Definitely some Phil wilson influence for sure, who is also a HECK of a maker.
 
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Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
Thanks! I sent Phil an email and pics of the blade to let him know I was making them but did not want someone thinking it was a Phil Wilson knock-off nor did I want to copy his designs. The little details set them apart.
 
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Jeremiah Rostig

Well-Known Member
Must be of the first generation of CPM steels.....Ground to 0,4mm, convex "rolled" edge, 60 Hrc +/-1, should normally not too thin and not too hard.In my opinion thick bevels are not giving the performance that I need, means cutting less agressive cos of the friction at the shoulders.A thick bevel demands the sharpening angle, is the blade thin and convex the user setting the sharpening angle.A user should have the opportunity to choose the angle, more flat-sharper, more steep more stable.
The more pressure you have to put on, the less control you have on the angle.
seems this steel is designed for 90 degree cutting angles like D2, but we talking about much smaller angles of a knife.
There are so many steels and we all choose the quality, that we think will give our knifes the performance they need.So for my knifes, this steel is not pertinent.
Cheers and respect.
 

Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
You could bump the Rc to 62-63 and see much better results with wear resistance and still have plenty of toughness that a hunting/ skinning knife needs anyway, I have read its on par with D2 @ 60. I did a One Stick fire with the blade today and had no chipping or failures and still hair popping sharp. Just a little test to see what it can and cant do and I have found the steel tougher than it was described to me. Darren Sanders used a hammer to force the tip of his little skinner through a 3/8's slab of osage. He reported no damage and brother osage is tough as wood pecker lips.

Just behind the edge is .010 so its thin and again no chipping and secondary bevel is approx 15* Again its not an easy steel to work with and YMMV.

Its been my experience most users do not know what they need or even what specifically the blade will be for. Its up to us as the maker to give them INFORMED honest guidance and let them decide, however as the maker I can polity suggest another trusted maker if I dont want to make the blade.
 
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