1095 Problems

Guindesigns

Well-Known Member
I bought me a bar of 1095 .125x1"x48" to make some fire strikers out of I tried heat treating them and it didn't.
And suggestion.
I used my paragon over got them to 1475 soaked for 10-15 then quenched in extra virgin olive oil preheated to 125 degrees.
I was thinking of using water next.
 

tkroenlein

Well-Known Member
What is the size and shape of your strikers? They would likely need to be very thin and scale free to cool fast enough in the oil. Volume of your quenchant matters too. Water might be your best bet.
 

Guindesigns

Well-Known Member
What is the size and shape of your strikers? They would likely need to be very thin and scale free to cool fast enough in the oil. Volume of your quenchant matters too. Water might be your best bet.
they are of my own design but basically a inch wide 2 in long and .125 thick. more like a pendent.
 

Guindesigns

Well-Known Member
Oil is suspect #1.

Steel vendor is suspect #2.

Internal condition of steel from vendor is suspect #2.5
I dont think the oil is fast enough after reading some info and seeing comments. and I got it from New Jersey steel barron.
 

Guindesigns

Well-Known Member
No need for the long soak with 10XX. Olive oil may not fast enough, if you have to use a vegetable oil go canola, it is faster. But the best bet is an actual fast quench oil designed to replace water. 10 min. in oven atmosphere would very strongly suggest decarb.
the edges have been clean up since the first attempt. should I clean the flats before going in for a second try?
 

Chris Railey

KNIFE MAKER
I have hardened plenty of 1095 in canola oil so maybe try that in lieu of the vegetable oil. Before that though, how are you checking hardness? With a file? I would clean up entire piece very well and check for hardness again before I re-heated. Sometimes you will grind away all the decarb and get to hard steel. If that fails, I would go to using pre-heated canola, I know it works.
 

billyO

Well-Known Member
Where/when did you get the steel? Following up on Mr Doyle's comment, there was a discussion about a year ago on another knife-maker forum about one of the major suppliers having a bad batch of 1095...I can't remember which one, however.
 

Guindesigns

Well-Known Member
I have hardened plenty of 1095 in canola oil so maybe try that in lieu of the vegetable oil. Before that though, how are you checking hardness? With a file? I would clean up entire piece very well and check for hardness again before I re-heated. Sometimes you will grind away all the decarb and get to hard steel. If that fails, I would go to using pre-heated canola, I know it works.
yes with a file and ive clean the decarb off the edges and even tried sticking a piece of flint to see if they would spark.
 

Guindesigns

Well-Known Member
Where/when did you get the steel? Following up on Mr Doyle's comment, there was a discussion about a year ago on another knife-maker forum about one of the major suppliers having a bad batch of 1095...I can't remember which one, however.
a few weeks ago from New Jersey steel barron. but a friend of mine got some bars from the same batch and used water and his harden just fine.
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
In addition to taking Kevin's advice,

I would verify your oven is accurate. I personally would not assume a brand new oven is accurate, even a paragon or evenheat.

I've heard of a lot of guys recently checking their new ovens and finding out they're off the mark quite a bit.

Also, normalizing everything from NJ Steel Barron is probably a good idea. At the very least, a couple thermal cycles.
 
Top