WIP: Full Featured 2x72 for under $1500?!? Housemade Gen 4 Revolution Kit Build

Bühlmann

Well-Known Member
Not sure what goes on with the pics, as I have seen what you describe at times, too. Each photo is uploaded to this site's server, and not a 3rd party hosting site (with the exception of the video). So there must be some intermittent issues on their end. I won't ever remove the photos, because that would make this thread useless to anyone that may use it in their journey.
 

Bühlmann

Well-Known Member
Also, a little update. I've been struggling with the VFD and getting that all ironed out. Not much to show or post on until that is dialed in. I'm still waiting on that Pheer drive wheel, which is my missing link in potentially isolating a symptom I am having with mid-range vibration. I need to load the motor to see if this goes away. If it doesn't, then I will most likely return my original VFD and try another one that is not such a budget version. That may blow my $1500 limit, but the cheap VFD can still be an option for those that can live with the symptoms.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
Cheap VFDs are all I use and never had that problem with a motor under load. I'm trying to remember if the issue was there with a motor sitting on the bench with no drive wheel.
 

Bühlmann

Well-Known Member
Got the handle material shaped & polished. First time using this material and it turned out pretty cool. Sanded up to 800 grit and buffed with a little brown tripoli.

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I decided to just ignore the oversized holes in the handle & just let the epoxy do its job.
 

Bühlmann

Well-Known Member
Well, after a week of deep, deep soul searching, multivariable calculus, some dark web research, intense meditation, and several contemplating pipes stuffed with Boswell’s Best, I’m happy (and kinda proud) to report that I believe I have the VFD programming issue figured out. I want to give a special THANK YOU to “fitzo” for sharing a manual to a similar unit that was written much better—though still not well—than the one that accompanied mine. It allowed me to bridge some gaps in terminologies and definitions.

I got the new 6” drive wheel today, mounted it up and ran it with a belt. I don’t think I could ask for better initial performance from a motor/VFD combo that costs about $350. Time will ultimately tell, but worst-case scenario is I have another skill set and best case is that it runs like a raped ape for years and years to come!

So here it is, not quite finished yet but fully functional:


I run it up & down the pot, then do a hot reverse. The tracking took some fiddling, but I was thrilled how it runs forward/reverse with almost no shift in belt position.

ETA: I see the video cuts out before I do what I mentioned above, so you’ll just have to trust me.
 
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Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
This was one terrific WIP. At first, I figgered "I could do that ". Then it changed to " NO "$%-%$ing way could I do that".
I'll be sticking to my files and elbow grease.
Thanks again for the WIP.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
A very good WIP, and it does look like it's running as smooth as can be. You'll find reverse a handy feature. I guess we can say the grinder is a "smooth operator"? :) Congrats on a job well done.
 

fitzo

Gold Membership
Congrats on the build, Eric! Very sharp machine, and I am very happy you got the VFD worked out.
As, for the manual, that was just a Google. I am thrilled it helped. You are most welcome; it is my pleasure to help.

Nice machine! Hope it provides decades of trouble-free operation. Thank you so much for the WIP!
 

Bühlmann

Well-Known Member
Thank you, fellas. The machine is done as far a fab & assembly go, but I still have a few "upgrades" to share. One is a really cool True-Tilt bevel grinding table accessory that I'll fit up. The other is an addition to the platen D-plate that will allow a 6" contact wheel in lieu of the 2" aluminum platen wheel--this will give me a 2" contact wheel on top and a 6" contact wheel on the bottom of the flat platen tool arm. A real combination platen arm. I just finished sketching out the template last night. I'll post as I progress.

The other thing I was planning to do is mount the VFD inside of a .50 cal ammo box. It has the removable display that will allow that with some mods to the box. But the more I think about it, the less I think it's necessary. I think filtering the cooling air intake and exhaust is going to be necessary, but I think I can accomplish that easily enough without the added hassle and bulk of an external box. I'm happy to take any insight or ideas on that. I have a solution in mind using reusable foam filters from a small engine that I already have.

Thanks again for the kind words and following along. It's been a fun build, and I hope it inspires someone else to make their own!


So now we have a complete fab'd up chassis, complete wheel kit, motor and VFD. Let's check the ledger:

Revolution 4 Cut Kit w/weld seams removed: $595.00
Ameribrade wheel kit (2-2" wheels, 4" tracking wheel, & 6" contact wheel): 233.00
Automation Direct IronHorse MTR Series 2HP 3600 RPM 3ph Motor: 262.00
Amazon 3hp/2.2kw YL600 VFD: 89.99
220V complete wiring kit from Housemade.us: 68.00
Pheer 6" Drive Wheel: 100.00

Running Total: $1347.99

 

KenH

Well-Known Member
Allow me to say again, job well done. and listing the itemized prices is always good. That gives the rest of us a "go by" for ideas of cost.

I agree, while a .50 cal ammo box would be dust free, cooling might be an issue. I've been using filters over the air inlets for the past several years with good success. Here's a thread where I write about my method:

I've been using your idea of a 2" wheel on top of platen with a 6" wheel on bottom for the last yr or so and find it useful. I think you'll be happy you did.

Ken H>
 

Bühlmann

Well-Known Member
I had to focus on my real job for a bit, but I got around to designing & fabbing up a D-plate extension to accommodate a 6” contact wheel for my platen arm.

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I made a support gusset for added rigidity, but I’m not sure it’s necessary. What do y’all think? I’m interested in your thoughts on this.

DF4D8A35-CFD1-4AC8-89BA-84AFA0967F18.jpeg



With this platen assembly I can use the flat platen, the 2” contact wheel…

CF31A334-2E1C-43BC-B306-A5200A95657D.jpeg



….and the 6” contact wheel without changing the tool arm.

92A062B4-E95D-4B2F-ACE0-E0D3F7218D44.jpeg



I ended up removing a little over an inch if the tool arm to allow the entire assembly to nest in closer to the frame, reducing the spring tension on everything due to the additional perimeter the 6” wheel creates. No adverse affects from that.


No additional project cost for this, since it was accounted for the original wheel kit.
 

fitzo

Gold Membership
That's a beautiful machine. I've really enjoyed your build thread, Eric. Thanks!

While I agree with Ken that it doesn't need it, the gusset piece is all ready to lay in there. I'd go for the overkill, personally. :D
 

52 Ford

Well-Known Member
I had to focus on my real job for a bit, but I got around to designing & fabbing up a D-plate extension to accommodate a 6” contact wheel for my platen arm.

3C2CCCED-21C6-4CEF-A78D-7601EF03E1DA.jpeg



I made a support gusset for added rigidity, but I’m not sure it’s necessary. What do y’all think? I’m interested in your thoughts on this.

DF4D8A35-CFD1-4AC8-89BA-84AFA0967F18.jpeg



With this platen assembly I can use the flat platen, the 2” contact wheel…

CF31A334-2E1C-43BC-B306-A5200A95657D.jpeg



….and the 6” contact wheel without changing the tool arm.

92A062B4-E95D-4B2F-ACE0-E0D3F7218D44.jpeg



I ended up removing a little over an inch if the tool arm to allow the entire assembly to nest in closer to the frame, reducing the spring tension on everything due to the additional perimeter the 6” wheel creates. No adverse affects from that.


No additional project cost for this, since it was accounted for the original wheel kit.
Nice looking grinder!

Are you using a foot pedal with that TIG machine?

If you don't mind a little constructive criticism, I would let the puddle form a bit more at the beginning of the weld, and at the very end of the weld I would slowly taper the amperage off and keep moving.

Edit: here's one of the welds on a grapple I made a while back. I made it to pull hay bales out of the loft in the barn. Anyway, that's a stick weld, but still. Figure I aught to show that I'm speaking from experience. Been welding a long time
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Bühlmann

Well-Known Member
I don't mind constructive weld criticism at all. I'm self-taught and only been at it sporadically for around a year....enough to finish one 80lb bottle of argon. Those are not my best welds, but the are a good example of me letting the heat build up at the end of my string, and me panicking to try to keep things from melting away. I get pretty focused on the point of weld and fail to plan ahead with easing up on the pedal near the end, so you're call is correct. I also ran out of 1/16" rod and was using .035" rod I have on hand, which I have to feed to quickly for me to control very well. But I agree that I think it will be sturdy enough, and adding more heat with gusset welds will risk warping. Thank you for the tips!
 

52 Ford

Well-Known Member
I don't mind constructive weld criticism at all. I'm self-taught and only been at it sporadically for around a year....enough to finish one 80lb bottle of argon. Those are not my best welds, but the are a good example of me letting the heat build up at the end of my string, and me panicking to try to keep things from melting away. I get pretty focused on the point of weld and fail to plan ahead with easing up on the pedal near the end, so you're call is correct. I also ran out of 1/16" rod and was using .035" rod I have on hand, which I have to feed to quickly for me to control very well. But I agree that I think it will be sturdy enough, and adding more heat with gusset welds will risk warping. Thank you for the tips!
If that's what you're doing after a year of self teaching, you're certainly on the right track. If you have any questions, check out the WeldingWeb forum. Lots of knowledgeable welders over there.

Weldingtipsandtricks, 6011.com, and This Old Tony are 3 YouTube channels that come to mind for learning TIG

Sent from my Champion Forge using Tapatalk
 
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