"wetter" green chrome rouge

Cap Hayes

Member
Can anyone tell me what green chrome they use that's kind of greasy? Looking at USA Knifemaker, their green rouges are all listed as "dry". I didn't notice that when I ordered it and found the rouge to be a lot dryer than I used to use. I would like to find one that's a little greasier, because I think it loads onto cork belts better.
 
Hi,CapHayes, of late I'v wonder on the make up of buffing compounds,Thinking of adding my rock tumbler graded grits to wax..

So your post led me on a Dr google hunt,that as far as u tube whent had 1 flick on home made product,that used chrome oxide powder & bees wax (which is realy one of the softer waxes,but the mix was aimed at our wood working cousins, & a thourgh research,suggests adding mineral oil/jelly etc to make more of a soft paste )

For buffing wheel bars carnuba wax pops up as a harder wax base.

Then I found the holy grail of compound info by Donald Watland, of Watland Design & was posted on http://sydneywoodturners.com/site/articles/finishing/buffing2.html

So it go's into a great deal more detail than my idea of adding grinding grits grades to wax ,well it explains what compounds are in the diffrant grades of bars,not so much on the wax side of things..

For your problem I'd melt & add a tad of mineral oil or petroleum jelly to get a softer compound

The diffrant colours seem to more related to the oxides colour than wax dyes..

Hope this helps,as knifing is such a hands on sport,making kit to use is also part n parcel of the process for me.
 

Cap Hayes

Member
Hi,CapHayes, of late I'v wonder on the make up of buffing compounds,Thinking of adding my rock tumbler graded grits to wax..

So your post led me on a Dr google hunt,that as far as u tube whent had 1 flick on home made product,that used chrome oxide powder & bees wax (which is realy one of the softer waxes,but the mix was aimed at our wood working cousins, & a thourgh research,suggests adding mineral oil/jelly etc to make more of a soft paste )

For buffing wheel bars carnuba wax pops up as a harder wax base.

Then I found the holy grail of compound info by Donald Watland, of Watland Design & was posted on http://sydneywoodturners.com/site/articles/finishing/buffing2.html

So it go's into a great deal more detail than my idea of adding grinding grits grades to wax ,well it explains what compounds are in the diffrant grades of bars,not so much on the wax side of things..

For your problem I'd melt & add a tad of mineral oil or petroleum jelly to get a softer compound

The diffrant colours seem to more related to the oxides colour than wax dyes..

Hope this helps,as knifing is such a hands on sport,making kit to use is also part n parcel of the process for me.

Thanks Kevin,

I may have to give it a try. I've been out of things for a while and I can't remember where I got my previous bar or who made it, so I'm kind of stuck with just buying different ones until one works. But, with the way things change over time, who knows if anyone even makes the one I used to buy.

Cap
 

Cap Hayes

Member
Based on a tip from Mike, I have ordered some compound from Empire abrasives. I talked to them before ordering and got the impression that theirs are not so dry. I ordered all of the rouges I typically use, so I will report back if they work out well.
 

Cap Hayes

Member
I'll continue to update/document my trials here. I received the Empire stuff and tried three of the four bars I ordered. It's greasier than the previous bar I got from USA Knifemaker and it sticks decently to buffs. I tried both green and blue on cork belts and found them to be OK, but still not what I've used in the past. I guess some people don't like the left over grease, but that's easy for me to clean off.

The Empire white worked very well on micarta and stabilized wood on a loose buff. I will probably stick to it for handles. All of them stuck better with a little oil to get them started, another tip from Mike. I didn't use WD40 because I didn't have any in front of me, but that's what he suggested.

On another tip from Mike, I gave K&G a call and they told me that their K&G Compound, item code ABKG is their greasiest and a copy of the old Sheffield stuff. Apparently they sent out and old bar to a compound manufacturer and had it copied. It's a bit pricey at $23 and flat rate shipping is $16, so get ready to order several items or pay 3-4x what you're used to for compound. I ordered a bar and will report back. If it works, I'll order 2-3 more and set them aside. This stuff sure didn't get any cheaper in my 10 years away.
 
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