Wet molding.

jmforge

Well-Known Member
A year or three back, I managed to score like 5 JRE "factory second" bushcraft sheaths from L.T. Wright. I have used one for my riff on a Kephart in 115W8 and black walnut. The sheath fits okay, but not great. I have 4 more of this blade pattern in .110 AEB-L waiting for heat treatment. Can these sheaths be wet molded for a better fit or would the finish prevent that?
 

chrisstaniar

Well-Known Member
I've wet molded pre-made sheaths before and it seemed to work out ok. I had to soak them longer and flex them around some.

The best thing I've found to do is after they are wetted down, wrap the knife in Saran Wrap, put it in the sheath and then use a vacuum sealer (like you use for vacuum bagging meat in the freezer) to shrink fit the sheath around the knife. Leave it in there for a few hours and then take it out to dry.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
That's an interesting idea Chris - I think I'll try it. Got a sheath ready for wetting down and forming now. Thanks for the idea.
 

Marty

Well-Known Member
I've wet molded pre-made sheaths before and it seemed to work out ok. I had to soak them longer and flex them around some.

The best thing I've found to do is after they are wetted down, wrap the knife in Saran Wrap, put it in the sheath and then use a vacuum sealer (like you use for vacuum bagging meat in the freezer) to shrink fit the sheath around the knife. Leave it in there for a few hours and then take it out to dry.
I shall be trying that
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
The vacuum sealer really will pull a tight fit around the sheath. If the vacuum is left too long the leather will really pull tight around the handle as well as the blade.
 

chrisstaniar

Well-Known Member
The vacuum sealer really will pull a tight fit around the sheath. If the vacuum is left too long the leather will really pull tight around the handle as well as the blade.

It does yes, but it loosens up over time and it's good to be too tight for now.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
Oh, it does suck the wet leather to shape over the knife, I was surprised how well it works. I've done two sheaths and pleased with both. Now time to oil them with neatsfoot oil and call sheaths complete.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
Ken, how did you wet the sheath?
With water? Well, actually I used a solution of "Pro-Crav" casing concentrate. This takes 1 part Pro-cav to 10 parts water. Pro-Cav makes the leather more "wet" (?) and form better. It's normally used to wet the leather for carving.
 

jmforge

Well-Known Member
With water? Well, actually I used a solution of "Pro-Crav" casing concentrate. This takes 1 part Pro-cav to 10 parts water. Pro-Cav makes the leather more "wet" (?) and form better. It's normally used to wet the leather for carving.
LOL. I meant did you spry it. dip it, fill it up at the faucet, soak it and if so for how long? HOW wet do you get it? It looks like Eco Flow also makes a version of that casing solution. That might work better for me as the local Tandy store carries the Eco Flow line.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
{g} I mixed the solution in a cup, then used my fingers and a paper towel to really soak the leather inside 'n outside both. Well, maybe not really "soak" but it was pretty damp.

I think the Pro-Carv is much like a soap, a wetting agent if you would to allow the water to soak in easier. Understand, I am NOT an expert with leather work, not at all. Just stumbling around :)
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
This came from a sheath making forum. They said this was the Pro-Carv leather casing formula. As mentioned above I thought it was a soap type mixture. The Lexol seems to be a leather cleaner, with only a small tad of baby shampoo. I wonder what the Listerine does?
************************
No More Tears Quick Casing Formula from IILG

Makes a Pint (the formula scales up)
1/2 Cup Lexol
1-1/2 Cups Distilled Water or Filtered Water
1 Tablespoon Johnson's No More Tears Baby Shampoo
1 Tablespoon Listerine (original brown)
 

jmforge

Well-Known Member
This came from a sheath making forum. They said this was the Pro-Carv leather casing formula. As mentioned above I thought it was a soap type mixture. The Lexol seems to be a leather cleaner, with only a small tad of baby shampoo. I wonder what the Listerine does?
************************
No More Tears Quick Casing Formula from IILG

Makes a Pint (the formula scales up)
1/2 Cup Lexol
1-1/2 Cups Distilled Water or Filtered Water
1 Tablespoon Johnson's No More Tears Baby Shampoo
1 Tablespoon Listerine (original brown)
Well, cows do have pretty stinky breath........:)
 

bladegrinder

Well-Known Member
Unless you have that stuff laying around you could probably just buy some pro-carv and call it a day.
Amazon has an 8 oz. bottle for $12.00 from Springfield leather, then you know your using some time tested stuff.
I'm kind of leary of using some home brewed concoction on my leatherwork.
 
Last edited:

jmforge

Well-Known Member
The Tandy store is right around the corner from my dad's house out in Brandon, so I will drop by there.
 

bladegrinder

Well-Known Member
I used to live in Clearwater, I moved last September. the real estate down there is crazy, my house sold in one day on the market.
 

jmforge

Well-Known Member
I used to live in Clearwater, I moved last September. the real estate down there is crazy, my house sold in one day on the market.
Yeah, I'm looking a bit north. My house needs a fair bit of work, but even with that, It is stil wroth over twice what I paid for it in 2003. It would be like 275 times if it was in tip top shape. Where did you end up moving?
 

bladegrinder

Well-Known Member
I bought my house in the early 80s. it was built in the late 50s. my house needed some work too but I was told by several people in the real estate business that unless it's an actual addition to the house any upgrades like kitchen or bath may not be a good idea as whomever buys it might just rip everything out and replace it to their taste. I sold for over 4 times what I paid for it but when you take inflation, cost of living, and pay scales from the 80s and today, it's all relevant. but right now the Tampa Bay area is on the top of hot real estate in the U.S.

Of course if you sell a house...that means you need to buy one, which puts you into a bad spot with prices where they are.
I started on a new house three years before I retired last Sept. so I set myself up and also built a new shop so it was a turn key situation for me.
I feel extremely lucky where I'm sitting in life right now and somehow worked hard and played my cards right.
I moved to N. Florida in the panhandle, and escaped the city life...:D
 
Top