Welding Table

Gliden07

Well-Known Member
Hey guys, don't know if any of you may interested but I just bought this Little welding table with a set of fixturing tools. It is definitely not for production work. But nice little table for the sale price of $169 plus shipping. Straight shipping to me was $52 but if I joined their yearly club for $39 I would get Free Shipping for this order and for the rest of the year on any future orders!

 

MTBob

Well-Known Member
You'll love that perforated top, makes for easy fab layout. The frame/legs may be a bit light, but you can easily reinforce it. Looks like a good deal.
 

Gliden07

Well-Known Member
I am definitely not a good welder and was playing with it today a little bit just pulling practice beads with my Hobart Handler 140. I have the gas conversion so it's easier welding than the Flux-Core wire. Nice to have a table to attach everything down. Take a look at some UGLY practice welds! LOL!
 

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Brad Walker

KNIFE MAKER
I got the same one a month ago. Im not a welder, but I do occasionally. I have found the attachments are great for gluing liners and other things. I put a cutting mat over the top and it works great as a work bench until I need the attachments. I also added casters. Not really what it's meant for, but it works perfectly for me!!
 

Gliden07

Well-Known Member
I got the same one a month ago. Im not a welder, but I do occasionally. I have found the attachments are great for gluing liners and other things. I put a cutting mat over the top and it works great as a work bench until I need the attachments. I also added casters. Not really what it's meant for, but it works perfectly for me!!

Yeah, I ordered some casters for mine too! Plan on adding a piece of peg board to hold the clamps and maybe an angle grinder or 2.
 

MTBob

Well-Known Member
I am definitely not a good welder and was playing with it today a little bit just pulling practice beads with my Hobart Handler 140. I have the gas conversion so it's easier welding than the Flux-Core wire. Nice to have a table to attach everything down. Take a look at some UGLY practice welds! LOL!
I've not been formally trained as a welder, nor am I certified. But, I do a fair bit of welding in my shop, MIG and TIG. One of the great joys in my life has been to think up (or copy) a project and weld it together. Over the last year or two, I've made a bunch of "stuff" to support knife making. That's the thing - welding is the tool that allows you to make stuff - so you can do other stuff. Welding opens up all kinds of possibilities.
I've taught the basics of MIG welding to a number of people and, in each case, have suggested they watch Jody Collier at WeldingTipsandTricks.com. He is the primary guy I listen to when it comes to online welding resources and, by no means, am I in the same welding league as him. He is the Gold Standard - no BS, highly competent, and makes crisp to the point videos. There are a few others that make good videos, but there are also many that aren't worth watching.
Check out this link and all the other associated videos by Jody. https://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/Mig-welding-tips.html
Here's his YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqq70AnPkj4-UApS_m_6mPw
Have fun and listen for bacon frying!
 

fitzo

KNIFE MAKER
Please pardon me for an OT question, but is TIG any easier to see the work than MIG is? I gave away my 115V Millermatic MIG when I thought I'd never do shop work again. Now, even if I do stock removal, a welder is just a really attractive tool to have for the very reasons MTBob mentioned. I had a heck of a time MIG welding because the sparks was too bright at anything other than an auto-dark level I couldn't see anything.

So, my question: is TIG any easier on the eyes and the ability to see the work? Maybe I need to stick to the gas torch? the one thing that may be affecting this is I have cataracts. Not enough for surgery, but there.

Any opinions very appreciated.
 

MTBob

Well-Known Member
is TIG any easier to see the work than MIG is
IMHO I don't think so. Both are bright. But, you hit on one of the Key welding issues - being able to see the molten puddle, and wire as it enters the puddle - in addition to seeing the joint near the weld. Here's my rule: if you can't see the puddle clearly, you can't weld properly. For an amateur welder like me with aging eyes, that means buying the best possible electronic hood you can afford. A cheap (e.g. Harbor Freight) hood will be marginal for many folks. The hood needs to have a shade setting (light/dark) and time after arc setting (speed that the shade is triggered). Advanced hoods will also have grinding and torch modes, important features. A reasonably good electronic hood will start around $150-200 & go up to over $500. With my eyes I finally took a deep breath and got a 3M Speedglas hood, amazing performance. I also use a cheater magnifier lens inserted inside the hood, that helps with my near nearsightedness & bifocals. Getting the proper hood is a personal fitting issue - young eyes may tolerate the traditional non-electronic fixed shade lens, but us older geezers (and many others) will absolutely need/want a good electronic hood.
Again, if you can't see, you can't weld!
 

fitzo

KNIFE MAKER
Thanks so much, @MTBob . You are so, so right about being able to see that puddle clearly or it's just going to end up gluing stuff poorly. I had what I thought was a decent helmet, it was the best autodark they had at the welding supply in town that wasn't the 3M. Cost a couple hundred near 20 years ago, IIRC. I'd been thinking about 3M when I got sidelined.

I appreciate your candid remarks regarding both being about the same brightness and pointing out it is perceived through aging eyes. Now that I am back in the shop, I have found that vision concerns are my primary impediment, not the bad back or arthritis. To that end I just finished installing enough of those LED bar lights mentioned in another thread that my house must glow from outside at night. :) It is one of those situations where I think I need to find someone with a small TIG I can try before wasting a bunch of money. I'm going to break out the gas unit and try my two torch sizes to see how I can do before I go after an electrode method.

Thanks, again! Gave me stuff to think about sir. And regret giving that very nice welder Miller away. Live and learn!
 

Gliden07

Well-Known Member
Yes welding makes a decent Auto Darkening mask very resonable. I got mine for $85 if I remember correctly? I will say that was a Christmas/End of the year special. The one I bought was the Panor. Its $139 on their site and you can get 10% off too.
 

MTBob

Well-Known Member
It is one of those situations where I think I need to find someone with a small TIG I can try before wasting a bunch of money.
FWIW, for me TIG has been significantly more difficult to learn than MIG. However, it seems most profession welders prefer TIG over MIG for a host of reasons. TIG seems much like rubbing your stomach and patting your head at the same time, there's a lot going on, all of which are important. TIG really shines on non-ferrous metal and delicate parts.
 

Gliden07

Well-Known Member
TIG I think is the hardest to do. You have 3 things to do at the same time. Foot pedal or thumb to strike and regulate the arc, filler rod to feed into the arc speed of movement, and that's after you decipher the set up on the machine. The hardest thing I found when I tried to TIG Aluminum was dipping the Tungsten into the puddle and having to regrind it again!
 
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