Twisted between the shin bone

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
#3
Excellent!
It has a bit of a middle eastern/Arabian look they way you put/left the lobes on the Camel bone.
The blackened rope pattern gives great contrast.
 

C Craft

Well-Known Member
#5
I like that one, WOOOHO! How did you achieve such a deep blackening, if you don't mind me asking? If you do I understand that too!
 

Jeremiah Rostig

Well-Known Member
#6
I like that one, WOOOHO! How did you achieve such a deep blackening, if you don't mind me asking? If you do I understand that too!
I work with 3 different types of Gun Blue:
For a light black colouring on fine blades I prefer Gun Blue from "Birchwood&Casey", this will in a few days/weeks turn into a grey medium shade, turns into a nice grey patina. its a relatively liquid cream wich makes it possible to spread it very quickly on the surface of the blade to get the desired even colour.
for more antique and darker finish I take a german Gun Blue called NuBlak it is a very dry cream wich spreads not easy and slow and it is much more agressive than
the Birchwood...but it makes the steel dark black-blue dull and somehow dirty looking. it makes spots on even surfaces if left sticking too long on a blade but it is good for corners, spines etc. and gives also that military used black look.
In my experience its the dry cream Gun Blue which makes and stays longer more dark. the more liquid the less agressive.
Also depending a little bit on steel alloy, but secondary.
 

C Craft

Well-Known Member
#9
I work with 3 different types of Gun Blue:
For a light black colouring on fine blades I prefer Gun Blue from "Birchwood&Casey", this will in a few days/weeks turn into a grey medium shade, turns into a nice grey patina. its a relatively liquid cream wich makes it possible to spread it very quickly on the surface of the blade to get the desired even colour.
for more antique and darker finish I take a german Gun Blue called NuBlak it is a very dry cream wich spreads not easy and slow and it is much more agressive than
the Birchwood...but it makes the steel dark black-blue dull and somehow dirty looking. it makes spots on even surfaces if left sticking too long on a blade but it is good for corners, spines etc. and gives also that military used black look.
In my experience its the dry cream Gun Blue which makes and stays longer more dark. the more liquid the less agressive.
Also depending a little bit on steel alloy, but secondary.
Thanks for the info, I have used gun blue but never got that dark of a finish!!!
 
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