Steel Asphalt cutting blade for knife making question

ACLakey

Well-Known Member
I was given around a dozen of these PR Diamond Asphalt cutting blades and would like to use them for knife making stock.  Each blade measures just under 18" in diameter and are .125" thick.  I called the company and they told me they were high speed tool steel with molybdenum but didn't have any more information than that.  Would these blades be a good material for making knifes?  Anything I should consider or processes I need to consider?  Thanks for the time.

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Rudy Joly

Well-Known Member
'IF' I had to use it without knowing all the specs except the ones mentioned, I'd treat it as A-2 with a plate quench. Modern saw blade alloys are usually used because they're cheap and could be one of many mixes not neccesarily prone to hardening.


Rudy
 

Rudy Joly

Well-Known Member
Something to keep in mind is the fact that the company doesn't need an alloy that has hardenability...especially when they're going to be brazing diamond segments to it. A hardened blade could be deadly if it shattered (dayooby, dayooby)...sorry couldn't resist. Toughness and stability is preferable in a saw blade application.


Rudy
 
Rudy is correct. Since the diamonds in those blades are what did the actual cutting, the body of the blades probably wont make a decent knife. If you can't get an actual spec. sheet from the maker, you can cut a small section and have it tested for its composition. Fastenal and a few other places will do it for you. I think its $75-$100. If they are decent steel you will still have to cut it up, anneal it, & thermal cycle it if you'll be doing stock removal. If its scrap iron you will be out enough $$$ to buy several bars of a quality blade steel.
 

EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
Ditto what Rudy and Darrin said!

I've been talking about this for a while, but it's worth repeating. For a number of years now, the majority of industry has used whats known as "spec manufacturing"....once upon a time, designers/engineers would specify a particular steel type for a given item. With "spec manufacturing" those days are long gone. Now a days they basically state what a particular item/tool must do, and then have it made out of the cheapest materials available. (less $$$ to produce, but they still sell the items for the same or higher price, meaning more profit) What this means is that you could have several different steels/materials within those dozen blades, even though they are the same brand....different runs COULD be made out of whatever steel/material was cheapest at the time of production (and would do the intended job).

So in reality, it might be more of a "crap shoot" then you realize..... you could spend the money to test one, and if the others are not made out of the same steel/materials, you're right back where you started from.

If it were me, they would go off the scrapyard, and the money would get turned into buying new/known blade steel.
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
what they all said. having a known steel makes the knifemaker's job a lot easier. basic steel is not expensive, using 1084, 80CrV2, O1, or AEB-L the steel for an 8" knife with 4" tang will be about $3 or $4.

 

ACLakey

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the replies and information...I will use these to make some decorative law art for the wife. :)
 
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