sharpening systems

seider

Well-Known Member
Has anyone tryed this system I looking for a way to keep everyting consistent with the next knifes I make.. I am working on a belt sander at the moment going to build me a forge have all the parts for that and have the steel for the 2 x72 belt sander i am going to make just need to turn the wheels for it and get bearings installed. Good thing about working at a machine shop.. Gonna make my boy a little knife first give me alittle practice


http://www.kmesharp.com/kmeknshsy.html
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
It's much the same as the Lansky system. I've tried a few of these over the years and end up going back the Arkansas stones.

Doug
 

seider

Well-Known Member
Yea I am probably going to do the. Buy hand. I have done everything else that way so far why stop now
 

C Craft

Well-Known Member
I have never tried that system but I have the Lansky and I love it for putting an initial edge on a a finished blade. One knife I sent out the guy was buying it for his grandson so made a special note of telling him that the knife was wicked sharp and too tell the boy to be careful before I ever sent the knife. Once it had arrived and he had a chance to look at he called me. I thought OH OH there is something that he didn't like but no he wanted to ask me about the edge on the knife. He said that was quite possibly the sharpest knife he had ever seen in his life! I told him about the Lansky system and how it worked.

I mean it this way I am an always have been pretty good about holding the right angle to get an edge on a blade. However lets say you do 50 strokes on a stone 25 on side and 25 on the other. If the angle is off on any of that 25 strokes you may be not gaining on your edge. With the angle fixed by the system you waste none of your effort and if you start with the roughest grit and keep up with how many passes you put on each side by the time you get down to the honing stone it really delivers a sharp knife. The first time I used when I got thru with last pass of the honing stone I wiped the oil from the blade with a paper towel. It wasn't till minutes later when I realized I had sliced my thumb pretty good. The blade was so sharp I never felt it cut me and the slice was so clean that it did not start to bleed right away. I have had razor blades that weren't that sharp.

So for an instal edge yes I do like the Lansky System and this looks pretty much like it. I prefer the oil stones to the diamond stones. Why, because the oil stones seem to lay down an edge that lasts longer than a diamond stone. Granted the diamond stones will bring up and edge faster but they don't seem to last as long as a oil honed edge will during hard use. Remember this is MHO and your mileage may vary!
 
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seider

Well-Known Member
Will look at both of them I have heard of lansky before I even started this knife making stuff :). I have always been good at taking a very full knife and putting a razor edge. I do not like the dimond stones I had one edge did not last long. I only use aluminum oxide blades and a fine and extra fine Arkansas stones. May have to try one of these fancy austems
 

knosaj

Active Member
Check out warthog sharpeners. I've seen them work a few times. Hey wouldn't have the extended life of simple stones but the system is easy to use and works very well.
 
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