Sharpen vs non sharpen display knives?

Retroguy

Well-Known Member
If a Custom knives or sword that are just for display on a shelf, should it be unsharpened. Or maybe display knives shouldn’t be in reach for wondering hands?
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
Unsharpened knives are not sharpen for a reason - they're made for show from cheap metal that won't hold an edge :)
 

Kevin R. Cashen

Super Moderator
"Knife: a cutting instrument consisting of a sharp blade fastened to a handle." -Websters Universal Encyclopedic Dictionary

I start many of my talks with this line to remind students what we are making, and that if we are doing anything at the expense of the very definition of what we are making we have lost our way. If it isn't sharp, and able to cut, we are no longer "knifemaking", we are just metal sculpting. Obviously, none of the swords I make will ever be used for there designed function, or at least I hope, but every one is sharp enough to be very "real" in every sense of the word as it hangs on the wall or in its display.
 

Retroguy

Well-Known Member
Thank you for some education regarding knife making. This forum may be as close as I get to being a knife maker apprentice or having a mentor. Part of the reason I ask is because I do have someone that wants me to make a knife to display. I am concerned about sharpening it because he does have teens in the house. Although he probably has sharp knives in the drawer also. My sharpening skills are sub par so maybe it’s a mute point. No pun intended.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
have teens in the house
By "teens" I'm assuming you're talking about 13 (and over) years of age. By that time they're (or should be) fully accustomed to using sharp knives in the kitchen while cooking meals. Wouldn't worry about a teen not being able to deal with a sharp display knife...... or am I "assuming" too much? {g}
 

Retroguy

Well-Known Member
By "teens" I'm assuming you're talking about 13 (and over) years of age. By that time they're (or should be) fully accustomed to using sharp knives in the kitchen while cooking meals. Wouldn't worry about a teen not being able to deal with a sharp display knife...... or am I "assuming" too much? {g}
No you are correct. However, I am a therapist and work with many children who were not dealt the best hand, so there judgement isn’t so good. So I think I am a bit over cautious.
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
I would only argue against Kevin's position in that some swords made for reenactments or for fencing need to be blunt in their edge and point. Though I guess you could call them sword shaped objects. As far as a dull knife goes I'd call it a letter opener.

Doug
 

Von Gruff

KNIFE MAKER
I would only argue against Kevin's position in that some swords made for reenactments or for fencing need to be blunt in their edge and point. Though I guess you could call them sword shaped objects. As far as a dull knife goes I'd call it a letter opener.

Doug
Nah Doug, my letter opener is just as sharp as my other knives as it sometimes opens packages as well as letters. ;)
 

Kevin R. Cashen

Super Moderator
I would only argue against Kevin's position in that some swords made for reenactments or for fencing need to be blunt in their edge and point. Though I guess you could call them sword shaped objects. As far as a dull knife goes I'd call it a letter opener.

Doug
Those would be "wasters", rather than swords. They are practice equipment in lieu of actual swords. Foils and Epees are sport equipment. Similar to how a prop pistol that is solid moulded plastic, or those only capable of shooting blanks, would like wise never be considered actual guns.
 

BossDog

KnifeDogs.com & USAknifemaker.com Owner
Staff member
COSPlay and LARPers want swords but don't really want to cut their enemies in half. In those cases, the client should be consulted and the sword given an edge and point accordingly. Medieval combat enthusiasts want working swords but again they don't really want to cut anyone in half. Shipping a sword of knife with an intentionally dulled edge or point 20 years ago would have been heresy. Today, it is just the reality of supply and demand.
 

Kevin R. Cashen

Super Moderator
I guess it is a matter of different marketing realities. Mine is based upon a reputation for never compromising on the functional aspects of my blades. When I get a request for blunted blades, I promptly refer the customer to a maker who works in that market instead.
 

EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
I guess it is a matter of different marketing realities. Mine is based upon a reputation for never compromising on the functional aspects of my blades. When I get a request for blunted blades, I promptly refer the customer to a maker who works in that market instead.
Precisely my viewpoint!
 
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