Quick question.

opaul

Well-Known Member
To tamper my blade from the Ricasoli to the tip do it the same as the handle??
I believe you are referring to a distal taper. I do mainly full flat grinds which lead to a distal taper as a result of the stock removal process.
If I understand your question you are asking if you can taper and then do the grinding?
 

Guindesigns

Well-Known Member
I believe you are referring to a distal taper. I do mainly full flat grinds which lead to a distal taper as a result of the stock removal process.
If I understand your question you are asking if you can taper and then do the grinding?
Yes I do mostly hollow grinds but I like the full look of a distal taper. I did my first tapered handle now I'd like to know how to match up the blade.
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
I heard that the Ricasoli’s shut down all tampering operations. Said it’s too hot right now. I don’t even know what that means.
Ricasoli's didn't shut down ALL tampering operations.....the current heat wave and fires in that region have caused major tampering shut downs. But the evidence tampering division is still in full swing. Once the monsoon season comes with the cooler temperatures, full scale tampering in all departments will resume.
 

EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
To answer the question....yes, with a distal taper, the thickest portion of the blade should be at/near the middle of the ricasso.....with the blade tapering/becoming thinner in both directions from there. How much is usually a matter of each maker's personal tastes. The idea/purpose of the tapers two-fold..... 1st, it balances a blade..... giving it a "light and fast" feeling. 2. It can add strength to a blade..... to explain..... if you place a bending force on a tapered piece of steel.... it changes into a arch. An arch is the strongest structural shape..... what it does is distribute forces over the entire length/area of the arch...... when you distal taper a knife blade, it not only makes it lighter/faster in the finished product..... but it also adds strength to handle more bending/lateral forces then the same blade made of a single thickness throughout its length.... that is, provides that the knifemaker does everything else "right"..... such as rounding the sharp corners of the spine, and and other areas that might create stress risers.

I'm totally lost on what the "ricosolis" thing is?????
 

Guindesigns

Well-Known Member
To answer the question....yes, with a distal taper, the thickest portion of the blade should be at/near the middle of the ricasso.....with the blade tapering/becoming thinner in both directions from there. How much is usually a matter of each maker's personal tastes. The idea/purpose of the tapers two-fold..... 1st, it balances a blade..... giving it a "light and fast" feeling. 2. It can add strength to a blade..... to explain..... if you place a bending force on a tapered piece of steel.... it changes into a arch. An arch is the strongest structural shape..... what it does is distribute forces over the entire length/area of the arch...... when you distal taper a knife blade, it not only makes it lighter/faster in the finished product..... but it also adds strength to handle more bending/lateral forces then the same blade made of a single thickness throughout its length.... that is, provides that the knifemaker does everything else "right"..... such as rounding the sharp corners of the spine, and and other areas that might create stress risers.

I'm totally lost on what the "ricosolis" thing is?????
So how do I achieve a distal taper. Like I told opaul tight now I do hollow ground knives. Can I still achieve a distal taper when I do hollow grinds and is the process for tapering the same as the on the handle as it is for the blade??
 

EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
OH! Forgot that part! Put the distal tapers in first thing....right after you cut out the profile. It's way more work then if forged in....and it will also make achieving a smooth hollow grind a bit more tricky....but once you learn how, it'll be nothing.

I use a large flat platen... and hold the blade with a magnet. I grind the blade portion with the tip facing down, and run the "flat" up towards the tang, over shooting the stop point. I do that on both sides of the blade, and then the tang.....on the tang end I am careful to end the flat at or near the middle of the ricasso...... the blade itself with viewed from the spine, looks like an elongated diamond shape.
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
There are a couple ways to do distal tapers on a blade.

You can grind the tapers in from ricasso to tip first, then grind your main bevels in.

Or you can grind in your distal taper as you grind in your bevels. This way is easiest, I find.

You can still have a distal taper with a hollow ground blade but certain things will affect the end result such as height of main grind, diameter of wheel and to some degree, the stock thickness.
 

Kevin Zito

KNIFE MAKER
Ricasoli's didn't shut down ALL tampering operations.....the current heat wave and fires in that region have caused major tampering shut downs. But the evidence tampering division is still in full swing. Once the monsoon season comes with the cooler temperatures, full scale tampering in all departments will resume.
Yes! Man, thanks for the info. I double checked their website and you are 100% correct. This news could not come at a better time. I was starting to get nervous. The Belello’s leave way to much “residue” behind, and of course, the Peranio’s are tremendously overpriced and chatty to say the least.
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
Yes! Man, thanks for the info. I double checked their website and you are 100% correct. This news could not come at a better time. I was starting to get nervous. The Belello’s leave way to much “residue” behind, and of course, the Peranio’s are tremendously overpriced and chatty to say the least.
I would never even give Belello's a moments thought, especially after the whole turtle wax fiasco. Peranio's are a bit on the pricey side, but the stiff competition created when Ricasoli's burst on the scene has forced them to come down a bit to stay relevant. They are WAY too "chatty" though. With Mr. Ferrentine at the helm of Ricasoli's as the new C.O.O., the company is heading in new directions that I fear will leave the Peranio's in the dust. I could be wrong?
 
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