pre-newbie questions on engraving/carving/texturing

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#1
Hey guys

Ive been thinking for a while to engrave or texture and maybe carve knives and other things (mostly metals)

I am mainly interested in rotary tools since they are versatile, i dont knowcthe differences though
Some i found reach few hundred thousand rpms while others range 30-60K.
Whats the difference between electric ones and the ones that use a compressor?

I hear foredoms are the best but but pricey for just 'an interest'
I found a chinese one like its thats fairly priced but afraid would it break on the 4th use or something

Any info would be awesome :)

Thanks!
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
#2
Only cry once!
Get the Foredom machine. You will find so many other uses for it in your knife shop that you will wonder how you got along without one.

Get the hand piece with the keyed chuck. Pass on the model with the collets.

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#3
Only cry once!
Get the Foredom machine. You will find so many other uses for it in your knife shop that you will wonder how you got along without one.

Get the hand piece with the keyed chuck. Pass on the model with the collets.

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com

i don't think i have that many tears in me to begin with...

i read the info on their motors anyway, didn't understand much, so will check video library.
i doubt i can buy it now though... specially with the pound dropping against dollar :D
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
#4
i don't think i have that many tears in me to begin with...

i read the info on their motors anyway, didn't understand much, so will check video library.
i doubt i can buy it now though... specially with the pound dropping against dollar :D
The Dremel tools are a less expensive option.Some are Chinese made I beleive? Then there's the Chinese brand machines will last forever as long as you don't put a load on it.

The Machine listed below on ebay will do all the wood, Bone etc carving and many other tasks..

Put this into the search box on Ebay.

NEW!! Foredom Professional Flexible Shaft Woodcarving Kit

About $220.00 plus shipping. I've had mine for over 16 years and I replace the brushes about every 5 years and the flex shaft cable insides about the same. there are many tricks you can do with this machine for handle sculpting and carving.. LOW Maintenance costs. Simple to fix yourself.

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com
 

dallas1

Well-Known Member
#5
I have bin using the same Dremel tool for 15 or 20 years but i don't know if the newer ones are as good. Witch ever one you get you will wonder how you ever did with out it.
 

Lagrange

Well-Known Member
#6
Like Tim, I have owned my dremmel for many many years and never had a problem with it, but you probably want to listen to what Laurence has to say because he has been doing this longer than me.
 

smithy

Well-Known Member
#7
I have been using a Foredom flex shaft for the last 35 years. It is my "right hand" in jewelry work and I can see it will serve the same purpose in knife making. The amount of bits and accessories (would you believe a 1" x 10" belt sander and a 2" hand grinder?) Rock solid holding devices that work with the fkex shaft are available from GRS. The amount and type of "bits" is astronomical. Quick change hand-pieces allow for fast work. A spare shaft and a set of brushes make you good to go when you have problems at 12:00 at night.

Foredom is not the only company that makes a good flex-shaft. Lucas industries (a dental tool mfg.) produces a very good, high quality unit., along with Pro-Craft and others.

H/F also manufactures a flex-shaft. It's cheap. I have never used one, but I find most of their tools work...but are NOT for every day, high torque usage. Buy the extended warranty.

For useful accessories, do a search for jewelry tools or flex-shaft accessories and check jewelry tool supplier's sites.

Here's a trick for your flex-shaft. Got a very tight area that is hard to get to? Cut a tooth pick in half, chuck it up in your hand piece, put a little compound on it and go to town.

This has been my "right hand" for 35 years, so if anyone has any questions, please ask away. ....Teddy
 

Mark Behnke

Well-Known Member
#8
Hi Teddy
I'm not fond of the foot pedal as it's hard to keep at a steady speed which seems to be what I need most of the time. Mine is circa.'70's A router speed control is hooked to my motor now instead of the pedal but it varies a lot in speed.

Any recommendations, tips, etc.?

Thanks in advance.
Mark
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#9
thanks a lot guys

now i could swear i replied to you Laurence this morning, dunno where it went... i did check ebay, and shipping isnt really that bad, BUT could this stand hard metals?! (and you sir, definitely are a man of many talents!!)

Eric and Tim, i was actually thinking about getting the dremel 4000 for a while, specially since i started making jimping on my knives, according Bill Coye, an attachment makes that a whole lot easier and cleaner. AND its affordable. but again when i read the reviews some people say its lower quality than the older models...


Teddy, thanks a lot for detailed info, i have few follow up questions if you don't mind
i will check the other brands you mentioned but for now lets talk foredom
have you seen stuff like starlingear products? they cast the rings for example and then they 'clean' them to reach a spectacular end product (you can find them here http://www.knifeart.com/starlingear.html)

also want to do carving and texturing on surfaces both soft (like handle materials) and hard like steel, titanium, etc.

what foredom do you think best suits me? electricity here is 230, so im between Powergraver, SR, and LX

also i want to know the 'bits', i am guessing anything that is carbide, but what else?
i hope its no trouble, sorta 'wide' questions i know

thanks again guys :)
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
#10
Hi Teddy
I'm not fond of the foot pedal as it's hard to keep at a steady speed which seems to be what I need most of the time. Mine is circa.'70's A router speed control is hooked to my motor now instead of the pedal but it varies a lot in speed.

Any recommendations, tips, etc.?

Thanks in advance.
Mark
Mark,

Attach the foot petal to the floor or I have a bigger piece of wooden board under mine. This will make keeping constant speed much easier. I don't care for the hand control models. using your foot means you can use both hands.

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com
 

knifecarver

Well-Known Member
#11
Hi SHOKR,

I used Dremels for many years because that was all I could afford. They aren't made well any more and they keep changing how the accessories are attached, making older models obsolete. I also had to decide, air or electric, rotary or air chisel. For me, being a creature of habit, I stuck with electric and a rotary machine. I bought a Foredom Micro-Motor for $300 off e-bay. The motor is in the hand piece, so it's a little bit heavy, but if I can use it, anyone can. Now that I did, I realized that Dremels don't spin at a high enough rpm to have the control I have now, so my work has improved and it makes 1/2 the noise the Dremel did. Don't buy a Dremel. Foredom is a quality machine and you can't go wrong with one. Rotary tools are a little tricky, so give yourself time to learn to use it.

Keep in mind that different tools/bits are rated for different speeds so even if you have a high speed machine, you can only run it at the speed rated for the tool you are using. I use dental tools, end mills, Dremel bits and carbide tools.

If you choose air, of course, you'll need an air-compressor and accessories and depending on where you use it, remember noise and size of the compressor. I believe air-tools have less moving parts, but require lubrication from time to time.

Hope this helps,

Cathy
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#12
Hi SHOKR,

I used Dremels for many years because that was all I could afford. They aren't made well any more and they keep changing how the accessories are attached, making older models obsolete. I also had to decide, air or electric, rotary or air chisel. For me, being a creature of habit, I stuck with electric and a rotary machine. I bought a Foredom Micro-Motor for $300 off e-bay. The motor is in the hand piece, so it's a little bit heavy, but if I can use it, anyone can. Now that I did, I realized that Dremels don't spin at a high enough rpm to have the control I have now, so my work has improved and it makes 1/2 the noise the Dremel did. Don't buy a Dremel. Foredom is a quality machine and you can't go wrong with one. Rotary tools are a little tricky, so give yourself time to learn to use it.

Keep in mind that different tools/bits are rated for different speeds so even if you have a high speed machine, you can only run it at the speed rated for the tool you are using. I use dental tools, end mills, Dremel bits and carbide tools.

If you choose air, of course, you'll need an air-compressor and accessories and depending on where you use it, remember noise and size of the compressor. I believe air-tools have less moving parts, but require lubrication from time to time.

Hope this helps,

Cathy
actually Cathy, that helped a lot

thanks, much appreciated :)

and you are right about compressors, i went to market to check my needs and prices, thinking i would need a small one, about 25litres that isnt so expensive, discovered i will need 50 litre one, which is BIG and it eas three times the price. not mention the noise though

i guess its electric rotary tool when i can afford it! :)
 
Last edited:

Wolfe

Well-Known Member
#13
If you really want to carve /engrave Hard Metal you really need high speeds like 300,000 rpms . Trouble is a good hi-speed handpiece will cost you from $300 to 400 dollars US. It's a dental handpiece and used in dental labs. Powercrafter I believe is a little cheaper, but not real quality. If you can save up for one you'll not be sorry. I've only been using one for 25 years.
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#17
got these today


chinese made carbide, probably perfect for discovering the process, will try it with dremel multi pro 285 (a relative lent me)

now what to test with those, what to test with those?! :D
 

Danae

Active Member
#18
I have an NSK Presto 300,000rpm (from memory) which is pneumatic

And a 40,000rpm electric cheap chinese micro motor.

High speed pneumatic is handy sometimes, but very often I find the micro motor is just as good... more torque even though it's got less speed. You're usually stuck with 1/16.

I got a battery powered one too recently which has collets so I can use 1/8th, 1/16th and 3/32, pretty cool.

Always been interested in flex shafts but never got to try one, I'm sure they're better than my dremel.
 
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