Making a huge custom

Mike Carter

Well-Known Member
I am making a video of a custom order I am working on. This is a huge knife inspired by a Russian survival knife. This one starts out as almost 5 lb of 3/8" 440C.

[video=youtube_share;UW9Mt7tBCUw]http://youtu.be/UW9Mt7tBCUw[/video]
 

Mike Martinez

Well-Known Member
That is one monster of a knife. And to think, I've been afraid of trying to make a 300mm Sujihiki. This is great, I can't wait to see part two... I'm subscribing to your channel!
 

stekker

Active Member
Very impressive knife, it's a clone of a Russian Spetsnaz machete.
Please keep us posted!

Theo.
 

Mike Carter

Well-Known Member
Here is Part 2 which is mostly grinding the knife. There are some video drop-outs toward the end from a bad tape but it is still watchable.

[video=youtube_share;KZHIblEsPJE]http://youtu.be/KZHIblEsPJE[/video]
 

Sean Jones

Well-Known Member
Amazing. Very nice work. I learned a lot about using a grinder from watching your second video. I know now I really need a better grinder.

Thanks for the video.
 

Mike Carter

Well-Known Member
A good grinder makes a big difference but I made knives for 3 years on the little 2" wheel on the Jet grinder you see in the video where I am grinding the stud for the end cap. My best recommendation is to learn to grind freehand. In my opinion jigs and rests are more of a hindrance than a help.
 

Ironlath

Well-Known Member
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Sean Cochran

Well-Known Member
Wow Mike I dont know what impresses me more...the knife or the fact that you grind sitting down. ;)
Cant wait to see it finished.

Sean
 

Mike Carter

Well-Known Member
Wow Mike I dont know what impresses me more...the knife or the fact that you grind sitting down. ;)
Cant wait to see it finished.

Sean
That's a trick I learned from Gil. Use a swivel chair and brace your elbows on your knees. It gives you a lot of control with freehand grinding.
 
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Gahagan

Well-Known Member
Yes Mike I used to get made fun of for grinding sitting down and was told to stand and brace on my hips I tried it but prefer to sit. I then got Gils Video and was happy to see him sitting it just showed there is no wrong way to grind as long as the end results are what you are wanting.
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
That was some excellent work there passing from the wheel to flat platen and back on all the different curves and flats that you have on a project like this.

I grind sitting down because I got tired of standing!:nothing: It doesn't matter why? as long as it works!

To Drop Point, One thing I've learned if anything in the Arms Race for the Best Grinder/Machinery is that Better Machines help,
But it's more the operator than the machine every time!

Laurence
www.rhinoknives.com
 
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RAGUEL3

Well-Known Member
The sit grind style eliminates back probs for a lot of the taller knifemakers as well, all the hunching over doesnt happen so bad.
 

Sean Jones

Well-Known Member
.....

To Drop Point, One thing I've learned if anything in the Arms Race for the Best Grinder/Machinery is that Better Machines help,
But it's more the operator than the machine every time!

Laurence
www.rhinoknives.com
Very true...it's as much the techniques he is using on this monster as much as the machine I am impressed with. I think maybe it's easier to see what's being done technique wise on a very large piece like this. At least for me it is.
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
Very true...it's as much the techniques he is using on this monster as much as the machine I am impressed with. I think maybe it's easier to see what's being done technique wise on a very large piece like this. At least for me it is.
Yep when you have about 1/2 an acre of steel like that beast his working on you can really see & Appreciate the free hand Technique used by this Craftsman at work.
I'm going to watch it again! Got any popcorn??

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com
 
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