Hidden Tang Question

DonL

Well-Known Member
I'm wanting to use a threaded tang on a stacked leather handle and in the future on hidden tang knives. I don't have a welder to weld a bolt onto the tang.

What other alternatives do I have? Thought about trying to grind/file the tang down small enough to run a die over, but figured that wouldn't work too well because I know my grinding tolerances!

Suggestions would be appreciated.
 

arock

Well-Known Member
I tried the die method it didn't work for me it was my first time ever trying it but I watched some youtube videos on how to use it but the tang seemed to be to hard for the die I didn't buy a high end set thought so that could be the cause. But you have a great question I hope you get some good answers I will be following this thread to figure out what to do.
 
If you thread the tang you either need to do it before heat treat or soften the tang after heat treat with a torch. If you do it when the steel is annealed its really easy. You can also cut/file a slot in one end of a threaded collar and pin it to the end of the tang. I used to have a picture of that type of construction but lost it when my computer died and I haven't taken another one yet. Maybe someone else can post a pic for you guys.
Another way is to solder/braze a piece of threaded rod to the tang. If you use that method be sure you make the joint at least 45 degrees to increase the surface area. A 90 degree joint is easy to break but the 45 degree joint works well if soldered properly.
 

LRB

Well-Known Member
" Another way is to solder/braze a piece of threaded rod to the tang. If you use that method be sure you make the joint at least 45 degrees to increase the surface area. A 90 degree joint is easy to break but the 45 degree joint works well if soldered properly. "

I prefer a pinned lap joint, then silver braze.
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
I turn the very end of my tang down and cut threads on it with a die. I use the belt grinder first, then a file. It takes about 5-10 minutes. Really not that hard at all. You should give it a try.
 

Wayne Bensinger

Well-Known Member
If your lucky enough to have a nice 9" South Bend sitting around with a 4 jaw chuck, you can turn it to an exact tolerance within 15 minutes or so, if not, then Mr. Doyle has the other method I've used. Both will work just fine, one is just a bit more accurate than the other. I'd practice first on some extra stock and with a little patience you should be able to get it done that nobody will know the difference. Both of these methods are definitely the strongest way as well. There's always that chance that the weld breaks or just about as frustrating is when it gets welded at a slight angle which almost inevitably happens when your welding something that small. Good luck, I think you'll be fine.

wayne
 
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