Hey, John Wilson (and any one else!!!)

Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
I would straighten up your bevels and finish them to at least 220 or or lower, after that blade is hardened your going to fight the devil getting a fine finish.
I am going to just that tomorrow..cause my fingers and hands are cramping up after four hours of filing. I usually also go for a 320 finish before ht. Thanks for the heads up and reminder Steve, I appreciate it.
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
Looking good, Bruce! I really like the shape! Just wondering if you’ve tried draw filing to flatten your bevels. It’s a great way to blend your angles and it’s sooo much easier on the hands than taking short little push strokes to try to blend.
 

Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
Looking good, Bruce! I really like the shape! Just wondering if you’ve tried draw filing to flatten your bevels. It’s a great way to blend your angles and it’s sooo much easier on the hands than taking short little push strokes to try to blend.
Good point, John. I used the draw file technique on the spine. It (duh) didn't even dawn on me for the bevels! They say that as you get older, your mind is the second thing to go. I can't remember the first thing. One question for ya though : what is the approximate measurement (depth wise ) of that beautiful swedge?
Oh, and another question : what in the devil is your avatar a picture of?
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
Good point, John. I used the draw file technique on the spine. It (duh) didn't even dawn on me for the bevels! They say that as you get older, your mind is the second thing to go. I can't remember the first thing. One question for ya though : what is the approximate measurement (depth wise ) of that beautiful swedge?
Oh, and another question : what in the devil is your avatar a picture of?

1. the swedge is a perfect angle and depth based on a a totally random angle I put on a scrap piece of plastic block. In all seriousness, I normally freehand everything but when it comes to swedges I couldn’t duplicate the angle on both sides. So I took a block of plastic and made a right triangle out of it. The angle was completely arbitrary.

The resulting swedge looked good to me and that’s how I do them all now.

2. my avatar is one of the first knives I made, and the very first one I was willing to let anyone see. I cut some shreds of paper with it to impress hot chicks. I’ve been meaning to update that picture for a couple of years now and I keep forgetting to do it.

D6B023CD-2109-45C9-A5D7-56263EF6A051.jpeg599F1647-759A-44CC-8271-B5479B6FDDC8.jpeg
 

Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
very cool. I mean the impressing of hot chicks. That's one of the things I forgot! I mean I remember trying to impress them. I just can't remember why.
Now to the swedge. I have the same problem with trying to duplicate stuff on either side of the blade. Must be a right side/left side kind of conundrum. I'll try your method of scrap material for a guide . I mean if you can do it , what could possibly go wrong with me trying to emulate your scientific methodology?
Thanks for the help, hombre. Next time I have a question, I'll ask my wife...if I can remember where she is....then when I find her, all I gotta do is remember the question, then the answer!
 

Sean Jones

Well-Known Member
Bruce I copied John's swedge idea when I was working on my Bowie for the KITH last year. If it helps I set mine at 30 degrees. But that was an arbitrary choice also.
 

Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
I seemed to have gotten away from this project. So, I did some catching up. Got the Swedge looking (to my ol eyes anyway) like I want it (subject to further modifications). Also the flat grind portion is coming along slowly.
That is an awful lot of real estate to smooth down with a file. Especially after cutting firewood all morning!
(Is that enough complaining?)DSC01579.JPGDSC01580.JPG
 
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