Hamon WIP - Updated Picture

#4
I really like that hamon, opaul. I'm currently working on a 1095 blade my own self.....hmmmmm, might just have to try that hamon thing.....hmmmm!
BJ
 

opaul

Well-Known Member
#5
What method do you use to heat treat your blades. I seem to have consistency with the EvenHeat. I haven’t tried producing one in my propane kiln.
 
#6
I'm using a propane forge, and don't forget, I'm so new to this that I don't know what I don't know!!! AND, I am a hands on learner, to boot.!
 

Chris Railey

Well-Known Member
#8
Hey OP, when you get a little bored with the etched hamon try one with no etching. Just sand it to like 800 or 1000 but do not etch. Its subtle but I really like that look too. If you do not like it you can always etch later.
 

opaul

Well-Known Member
#11
Hey OP, when you get a little bored with the etched hamon try one with no etching. Just sand it to like 800 or 1000 but do not etch. Its subtle but I really like that look too. If you do not like it you can always etch later.
Thanks Chris. I might try that.
 

opaul

Well-Known Member
#12
Thanks. The blade and the hamon was a spur of the moment decision this after noon. I had just finished the micarta on the other knife and felt like grinding
 

opaul

Well-Known Member
#14
OP you using furnace cement or Satinite to do it? Do you let it dry on blank before you HT or do you put it in HT wet?
I’m using refractory cement. I take about a 1/4 cup out of the container and thin it with a few sprinkles of water but still allowing for some consistency. I apply it to the blade evenly with a wooden pop cycle stick. I dress up the pattern with a que tip. I have read to let it dry but I put my blades in while the cememt mix still wet.
This has worked well for me. I quench the 1095 at 1465 degrees and let it soak for a few minutes.
 
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