Grinding Jig: Build or Buy?

tkroenlein

Well-Known Member
Never used one, don't know anything about 'em.

I'd like to know what features those of you who use one are valuable, or necessary or cumbersome. I'm looking to do scandi grinds and swedges. I want precision.

Any opinions or recommendations welcome.
 

KenH

Well-Known Member
You can take a look at this video for one of the best grinding jigs around.

Start about the 2 minute mark, and you might wish to fast forward thru some. He starts with the actual jig about the 3 minute mark. I see he grinds one side complete before starting the other side. I've always ground both sides, one or two passes on one side, then flip to other side. I made my jig with a roller thrust bearing in the base so the "tombstone" could be tight with no slack and still rotate.

It's an expensive jig, so I never purchased one. I did make as close a copy as I could and it works darn good. Like any grinding jig there is a learning curve, but I've been impressed with the final results. After using it for most of my blades, I now use it more for folder blades, and I might set the bevel and finish free hand grinding.

While being a master at free hand grinding is by far the best, good free hand grinding is hard for me to master. I don't do that many blades per year.
 
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Smallshop

KNIFE MAKER
You can take a look at this video for one of the best grinding jigs around.

Start about the 2 minute mark, and you might wish to fast forward thru some. He starts with the actual jig about the 3 minute mark. I see he grinds one side complete before starting the other side. I've always ground both sides, one or two passes on one side, then flip to other side. I made my jig with a roller thrust bearing in the base so the "tombstone" could be tight with no slack and still rotate.

It's an expensive jig, so I never purchased one. I did make as close a copy as I could and it works darn good. Like any grinding jig there is a learning curve, but I've been impressed with the final results. After using it for most of my blades, I now use it more for folder blades, and I might set the bevel and finish free hand grinding.

While being a master at free hand grinding is by far the best, good free hand grinding is hard for me to master. I don't do that many blades per year.
Wow...great design!

I get almost phobic watching his videos with him not wearing respirator....:oops:
 

tkroenlein

Well-Known Member
You can take a look at this video for one of the best grinding jigs around.

Start about the 2 minute mark, and you might wish to fast forward thru some. He starts with the actual jig about the 3 minute mark. I see he grinds one side complete before starting the other side. I've always ground both sides, one or two passes on one side, then flip to other side. I made my jig with a roller thrust bearing in the base so the "tombstone" could be tight with no slack and still rotate.

It's an expensive jig, so I never purchased one. I did make as close a copy as I could and it works darn good. Like any grinding jig there is a learning curve, but I've been impressed with the final results. After using it for most of my blades, I now use it more for folder blades, and I might set the bevel and finish free hand grinding.

While being a master at free hand grinding is by far the best, good free hand grinding is hard for me to master. I don't do that many blades per year.
That looks like an awesome set up. But I'm a lot of $$$ from getting to that, even if I build. I have a fixed (one off DIY) work rest that precludes using that style. I do like how the blade mounts though.
 

chrisstaniar

Well-Known Member
I have one that I use from belnapcustomknives.com . I just have the jig itself and not the tool arms. I use it for hogging off material and then I also freehand some. He also has plans (free) that you can build yourself. He has videos on youtube showing it in action
 
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