Giving Up The Hammer

DanF

Well-Known Member
I always said that when I retired I'd get a real anvil for forging. Eighteen months later my thumbs are saying, "no more".

That sucks, but at least I can still do stock removal.
What do you do with a 152 lb paperweight??
 

DanF

Well-Known Member
How disappointing that must be! Maybe just keep the anvil for old memories sake.
Sounds like a good idea, might paint it flat black to protect it from rust and set it out in front of the shop.
 

DanF

Well-Known Member
It's a Peter Wright, an old swaybacked, rode hard and put up wet war horse of an anvil.
 

EdCaffreyMS

Forum Owner - Moderator
Isn't it the pits? Just about the time we think we've got things figured out, our bodies start going south on us. There was a time when I could swing a hammer 12 hours a day, and not have any issues...... but those days are past. Thankfully I listened to some "old timers" who warmed me in my younger years that one day I'd probably not be capable of swinging the hammer like that.....which is the reason I have the air hammer and press in the shop. I'd like to keep doing this for as long as possible. All the best to you Dan!
 

Daniel Macina

Well-Known Member
I would definitely keep the anvil. Probably a lot of memories there and you might want the break it out every now and then if ya get that forging bug.
 

Gliden07

Well-Known Member
I have a very small hammer I built, thinking a press would be beneficial since I like messing about with simple, low layer pattern steel.
I was given a log splitter with no motor (perfect!). Just ordered a book on how to build a press. Even if I dont use all of it I have a good start. Was thinking of buying one but I'm a serious hobbyist and 5kish for a press is beyond me right now.
 

springer82

Well-Known Member
Keep your anvil. There might not be a flat spot on it but still. Everyone has things that they don't use anymore. It's like giving up part of yourself.
 
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