first time ..... no, not THAT ,,,,

opaul

Well-Known Member
I've yet to try that. What is your process. Do you tie the quarters together with wire prior to heating and hammering?
 

Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
I've yet to try that. What is your process. Do you tie the quarters together with wire prior to heating and hammering?
First , I cleaned the surfaces with alcohol. Then , I stacked 10 quarters together , put them into a sacrificial c-clamp, and placed them in the forge. I heated the billet til it was starting to "sweat" , then took it out and started hammering. Reheat and hammer some more. Repeat. Repeat again. And again. You get the idea.
 

EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
TIP: Remember that non-ferric (no iron) alloys are the opposite of Ferric alloys(iron)..... slow cooling and/or working hardens them, and heating to "red" and quenching anneals them. ;)

Something else of note.....DO NOT try learning mokume in any forge that you will try to forge weld in later! If you use ANYTHING that contains ANY copper, and said copper even remotely "melts", it creates copper sulfate..... that gets into your forge lining, and you will never be able to forge weld again in that forge.....until you completely clean it out and reline it. Every heard the practical joke of "throw a penny in his forge"? It's real.
 
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Daniel Macina

Well-Known Member
TIP: Remember that non-ferric (no iron) alloys are the opposite of Ferric alloys(iron)..... slow cooling and/or working hardens them, and heating to "red" and quenching anneals them. ;)

Something else of note.....DO NOT try mokume in any forge that you will try to forge weld in later! If you use ANYTHING that contains ANY copper, and said copper even remotely "melts", it creates copper sulfate..... that gets into your forge lining, and you will never be able to forge weld again in that forge.....until you completely clean it out and reline it. Every heard the practical joke of "throw a penny in his forge"? It's real.
wait… You can’t forge weld in the Forge after you make Mokume? Looks like I need to build a new forge.
 

Heikki

Well-Known Member
TIP: Remember that non-ferric (no iron) alloys are the opposite of Ferric alloys(iron)..... slow cooling and/or working hardens them, and heating to "red" and quenching anneals them. ;)

Something else of note.....DO NOT try mokume in any forge that you will try to forge weld in later! If you use ANYTHING that contains ANY copper, and said copper even remotely "melts", it creates copper sulfate..... that gets into your forge lining, and you will never be able to forge weld again in that forge.....until you completely clean it out and reline it. Every heard the practical joke of "throw a penny in his forge"? It's real.

What happens with the copper sulfate to prevent forge welding? I've been wanting to try making some mokume, but should probably understand this part.
 

Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
TIP: Remember that non-ferric (no iron) alloys are the opposite of Ferric alloys(iron)..... slow cooling and/or working hardens them, and heating to "red" and quenching anneals them. ;)

Something else of note.....DO NOT try mokume in any forge that you will try to forge weld in later! If you use ANYTHING that contains ANY copper, and said copper even remotely "melts", it creates copper sulfate..... that gets into your forge lining, and you will never be able to forge weld again in that forge.....until you completely clean it out and reline it. Every heard the practical joke of "throw a penny in his forge"? It's real.
I didn't know that so thanks. I'm certain that I would have done it !. Fortunately , in my long knife making career I haven't even thought about forge welding. I'll just stick to buying other people's Damascus.... When I can afford it !
 

EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
wait… You can’t forge weld in the Forge after you make Mokume? Looks like I need to build a new forge.
I did not say that. What I said was........
if said copper even remotely "melts", it creates copper sulfate gas
Also should have put in there copper trioxide.

I'm just trying to save folks some grief.

If you doubt it, toss a penny, or even an old .22 rimfire brass into your forge and see what happen next time you try to forge weld. :cool:
 
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Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
I did not say that. What I said was........ Also should have put in there copper trioxide.

I'm just trying to save folks some grief.

If you doubt it, toss a penny, or even an old .22 rimfire brass into your forge and see what happen next time you try to forge weld. :cool:
Is there any other ill effects to regular (heat treating ) use with regular (10xx) steel?
 

Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
So, now I have s dedicated mokume/heat treat oven. How cool is that? If I need to make damascus, I'll have to build another forge , right? Which is ok with me.
 
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