Fingerless Gloves and Forearm Protection

One

Banned
As I’ve gotten older, I’ve had problems with my fingers getting numb from cold when I’m working and it seems like any little bump or scrape on my forearms leaves a bruise or an abrasion.

These fingerless weightlifting gloves have good grip, help keep my hands warm and are comfortable to work with.

The forearm guards are just stretchy socks with the feet cut off. I still get a few bruises with them on,... but no abrasions, bleeding, scabs etc.





These also work good for outdoor activities,... yard work, camping/fishing etc.
 
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Drew Riley

Well-Known Member
When I used to work construction, I had a couple pairs of "framing gloves" that just had the thumb and first two fingers cut out.

Out at the steel mill I work at, they use the kevlar sleeves. Unfortunately, they're not flame retardent, but I believe "Carbon-X" makes some that are.
 

J.Higgins

Well-Known Member
Last year I worked in a local machine shop for a while. One of the guys went to change the end mill on his Bridgeport, and instead of hitting the button for the power drawbar, he absentmindedly hit the start switch. He was wearing some very close-fitting cut-resistant kevlar gloves. The machine started instantly and ripped off the glove, along with his forefinger and middle finger. That was in July, and although I dont work there anymore, he is still not back to work.

Moral of the story? Be careful. Lightning strikes.

The older we get, the more comfortable we become with our routines and practices. We've lived this long and with that have become complacent. Lightning strikes... just saying. Neo-tribal guys probably dont have much to worry about, since they do not use a ton of machines like machinist-types like me.
 

One

Banned
Good point. I don't forge with them on (not fire proof) and don't run any rotatory power tools with them on. The gloves are tight fitting and not easy to get off in a hurry. I use them mostly for bench hand work, fit and finish etc., which constitutes the majority of time I spend at knifemaking.

While we're on it, rings and jewelry can also be dangerous when running rotatory power tools. Loose fitting gloves that slide off easy sometimes get caught on rings that do some serious damage.
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
Guys,
I wear a Cabela's brand long sleeve heavy cotton Safari shirt in the shop with my cuffs always buttoned.
They give all the forearm coverage I need and last for years and breathe well. I wear my Rhino Finger Skins on my digits almost all of the time in the shop now. A fingerless glove would give more hand coverage from sparks while grinding but I am concerned that they might be grabbed by the belt or wheel like the incident J. Higgins just mentioned.

When I started knife making I was privledged to hang out with the late Bob Loveless and his crew a few times and he was adamant about now even wearing a wedding ring on your hands when working in the shop.
 

One

Banned
That's cool if it works for you.

For me, it's 90% elbow grease. Jackets and long sleeves impede mobility in my arms, when it's cold in the shop. It takes more energy with them on and sometimes my elbows even start to ache. I usually wear a Cabelas roughneck work vest, short sleeves shirts or sleeves rolled up, when doing bench work anymore. When I was younger it didn't bother me.
 
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roadapples

Well-Known Member
Second the no ring rule! My Uncle lost all but his pinky and thumb on his left hand due to his wedding ring getting caught when he was running a saw.

I'm still not sure about the gloves- saw a young lass that was forgewelding get some slag that rebounded off of her leather apron come to rest in the cuff of her kelvar glove, 2nd degree burn by the time she got the glove off.
 
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