File work... let's see 'em!

Clydetz

Buck 110 Collector and Casper's best friend
#1
Thought I'd post some pictures of file work on some knives I own. Some like file work; some don't. If you got any knives with it... let's see 'em!








 

LR Adkins

Well-Known Member
#7
2thumbs Man I want to be that good when I grow up.

I never tried filework on a knife, should have picked it up when I was younger. Now that I would like to do it arthritis and bad eyesight are stumbling blocks. It sure purties up a knife though.

Many of you on here really have the talent.

Larry
 

Mike Carter

Well-Known Member
#8
I just happen to have one on the bench now. A guy wanted me to pimp his Gerber. Here is work in progress. I'll post some better pictures when I finish it.





 

Mike Carter

Well-Known Member
#12
I've done it both ways depending on the blade and the complexity of the filework. After a blade is hardened I often have to rough in the design with a dremel rotary tool and then finish it with files and sandpaper.
 

a6cjn

Active Member
#13
I had this idea kicking around for a while



It ended up with a bit of a complicated handle construction



A couple of other attempts





Chris:)
 

Fletch Helical

Well-Known Member
#16
I've only ever done filework pre heat treat. I've heard diamond files will do it after, but I have thus far refused requests to try it.
How do you clean out all the filed areas after HT? I'd like to attempt some file work but I have no idea how to make it look all pretty after the HT :eek:
 
J

JDB

Guest
#17
How do you clean out all the filed areas after HT? I'd like to attempt some file work but I have no idea how to make it look all pretty after the HT :eek:
Hey Fletch,

First, like your handle man. I shoot left wing fletching myself. LOL

Next, lets get this out of the way. I'm no expert. Do very little of this kind of thing. I will say, if you are like me and do home heat treat and don't have a VERY GOOD oven, and protect the blade with clay or packets, wait till after it's heat treated to do the file work. The large amount of scale produced by quick quench methods will likely destroy much of the detail you worked so hard to put in.

Then you can do as Mike says and use diamond bits on a drimel to do the bulk of the work. Which works great. Or....you can even do a deferential quench that leaves the spine and tang a little softer to work. Or even soften them after heat treat if you know how. Then do the file work. I've done all three.

If you are sending it off to be treated in an atmospheric controlled oven, clean up should be as simple as sandpaper in most cases. Basically just redoing the last step before you sent it off to redefine the detail.

And it's true, these guys are GOOD!
 

Mike Carter

Well-Known Member
#19
How do you clean out all the filed areas after HT? I'd like to attempt some file work but I have no idea how to make it look all pretty after the HT :eek:
I just get into them with a needle file. I also wrap fine sandpaper around the files where I can. Then I buff it on a sewn cotton wheel with green compound.

If you do your work before HT, sometimes it helps to accent the detail by leaving the black in there.
 
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