Feels like home.

Fred Rowe

Well-Known Member
Thanks, Boss Dog:biggrin:

I feel at home here. Is that the smell of burning coke in the air? Or is it the quench oil vaporizing and catching fire? :1:

Any where you set up a forge it will be a magnet that draws people possessing a lot of talent.
Ten years of working hot metal behind me I have come to the conclusion that there is no better way to spend the day, than with friends @ the forge.
 

Bruce Bump

Forum Owner-Moderator
Fred, I've always wanted to roast wieners in my forge. I bet it will burn about 500 per hour if I had that many guests over.
 

Fred Rowe

Well-Known Member
Now there's a thought and possible inspiration for a shop project; can one build a rotisserie for a blown forge. No doubt in my mind.:35:
 

Wayne Coe

Forum Owner - Moderator
At one of my demonstrations I cooked a 1.5 second hot dog.
First draw a point on 1/4" square (or what ever) 2' long.
Heat at least 1' to red hot.
Shove a wiener on it length wise (use kevlar gloves to hold the wiener).
Put the whole wiener into the forge and back out in less than 1.5 seconds.
When you pull the wiener off the skewer it is done.
Add a bun with katchup, mustard and relish.
Enjoy with a cold home brew, Fred.
 

Archer Moon

Well-Known Member
One of my shop visits to Andy Franko had fresh roasted rolls on the edge of his forge. Learned a lot from him in about two hours. Need to go back. And the coffee was good too. Thanks Andy!
 

rob45

Well-Known Member
So if the the point is red hot, can I simply just put the wiener on the stick and be done without sticking it in the forge for 1.5 seconds?
It might take 2-3 seconds then, but I'm a firm believer in "slow-cooking".:biggrin:
 

Fred Rowe

Well-Known Member
At one of my demonstrations I cooked a 1.5 second hot dog.
First draw a point on 1/4" square (or what ever) 2' long.
Heat at least 1' to red hot.
Shove a wiener on it length wise (use kevlar gloves to hold the wiener).
Put the whole wiener into the forge and back out in less than 1.5 seconds.
When you pull the wiener off the skewer it is done.
Add a bun with katchup, mustard and relish.
Enjoy with a cold home brew, Fred.
For some reason I new you would have had experience forging hot dogs. You are truly a man of many talents.:5:
I'll have to try a couple of practice runs on the skewering move, so I don't impale myself.

I'll bet marshmallows would be a challenge.

Did you learn this at survival school?

Fred

One of my shop visits to Andy Franko had fresh roasted rolls on the edge of his forge. Learned a lot from him in about two hours. Need to go back. And the coffee was good too. Thanks Andy!
Sounds like a good visit.:1:
 

Wayne Coe

Forum Owner - Moderator
Sticking the weiner into the forge is good showmanship and gives grilled effect.
Try it both ways and report back.
Fred Let us know about the marshmellows. Did it make a mess in the bottom of the forge? Kinda like Borax?
 

Bruce Bump

Forum Owner-Moderator
I would think a stainless steel thin walled muffler pipe inside the forge would be sanitary when roasting the wienies. Flux picked up from the bottom of the forge would be too crunchy.
 

Indian George

Well-Known Member
Bubba's!!!! Your forges must be running really cold???:s7435: I tried cooking wiener too, in one of my forges and it burnt crispy before I could get it in the forge. HEHEHEHEHEHE!!!
 

Bruce Bump

Forum Owner-Moderator
Bubba's!!!! Your forges must be running really cold???:s7435: I tried cooking wiener too, in one of my forges and it burnt crispy before I could get it in the forge. HEHEHEHEHEHE!!!
You must have bought the dollar store variety, try Oscar Meyer brand and throttle it back to 1800f. :les:
 
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