drill bits for tang holes

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
Buy good quality cobalt bits (by far most important) and make sure the steel is in an acceptable internal condition (2nd most important).

I don't worry about much else. I've got 8 drill presses set from anywhere from 250 rpm to 2100 rpm and good cobalt bits of any size will drill through about any steel at any speed.

I drill dozens and dozens of holes per bit.
 

victoroni

Well-Known Member
my source for cobalt bits is CML supply the brand is "topline" bits are good for dozens and dozens of holes in high carbon - haven't used on stainless ? use a lubricant ( i just use 3in1 oil )
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
Have used both Viking and Norseman drill bits and am happy with both. I have a tabletop skil drillpress and run it at the slowest speed. did all the math and it is just a little bit faster than uddeholm recommends for Arne, otherwise called O1. https://www.uddeholm.com/files/PB_Uddeholm_arne_english.pdf figured this would be ok for basic carbon steels. Uddeholm is one of the few steel makers that list machining instructions in their data sheet.
as said above, all use lube or cutting fluid. mineral oil works fine. lastly, take your time. a good M35 or M42 drill bit should last for at least 100 holes.
 

whisperer

Member

Above is a link to bits on MMC, not posting an ad for them…. :)

I have a few of these in my most used sizes and they are bad-ass. They will drill through pretty hard stock. That being said, file check your tang. Seems like the same problem we have all had trying to drill hardened steel with Home Depot drill bits.
 

Edwardshandmadeknives

Well-Known Member
I’ve been using run-of-the-mill cobalt bots for years, and drill many many holes in stainless steel with just one. I’m guessing your steel is hardened, either work hardened or some other way. Even a HSS bit should drill 1095 easily
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
*still using the same #11 bit.

Not a joke.
I believe you. About a week ago I was using my go-to "F" drill bit. I tried to remember when I bought it and I couldn't. It lives in my drill press. I replaced the previous one some time ago because it got somewhat banana shaped over time because I turn it slow and use a whole lot of down force. (It's my hogging bit so accuracy was not even a consideration.) Between BoeLube (thanks John Doyle!) and a Drill Doctor- my bits last a long long time.
 

tkroenlein

Well-Known Member
I use the stick lube from McMaster Carr. It was $11 for a standard grease tube sized stick. It's somewhat waxy and liquifies with a little heat and solidifies pretty quick when you back off the pressure so it sticks on awhile. Works well on bandsaw blades too. I usually don't lube on thin stock.
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
I use the stick lube from McMaster Carr. It was $11 for a standard grease tube sized stick. It's somewhat waxy and liquifies with a little heat and solidifies pretty quick when you back off the pressure so it sticks on awhile. Works well on bandsaw blades too. I usually don't lube on thin stock.
i took your advice and got that stick lubr for my bandsaw. What a difference! So much better than squirting oil on everything and all the mess that comes with that. My little tube of Boelube has lasted forever but when it runs out i’ll use the stick lube for drilling too. That’s really good stuff.
 

thomster

Member
Having read the comments, I have a set of Viking bits now, but the last thing to check was my stock (1095) I don't think it was sufficiently annealed. With the next piece of 1095 (from the same batch) I used, I put it into my little forge and cooled it down as slow as I could, That made it FAR easier to work with going forward.
Thanks for the advice!
 
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