Craftsman 2x42 belt sander mod ideas

Discussion in 'New to Knifemaking' started by USMC_ROCKO, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. USMC_ROCKO

    USMC_ROCKO Well-Known Member

    Hello everyone, I know there is a ton of good information on the 2x42 craftsman and this is just some ideas I have and want to see what all the guys who own one or have owned a 2x42 or built there own will maybe be able to help me figure out if it will work. What I had an idea for the 2x42 is the platen sucks and you cant grind on the contact wheel cause it is only aluminum and I am trying to figure a way to fix it and make it work better than it was. Ok now I know of all the good grinders out there like Burr King,Wilton, KMG , NWG ,hardcore, Pheer , coote and many more. I know those are better grinders but at the time I can not afford them on my paychecks. So for my first idea, is to make a 2x6 grinding wheel from plywood like Michael Morris did and true it up and put it on so I can grind on the contact wheel. Not going to do hollow grinds just shaping blade profile. By doing that I think it would give more give and not kill the platen cause i use to grind shapes on the table to the platen. And the second part of my idea was to get a 2'' angle iron and make it the platen cause it is more square than stock platen , so I can grind bevels evenly all the time with some hard work and time. My second idea is just to basically take my 2x42 frame off and somehow attach it to a bench grinder that is 1hp and would make it work better then a 1/3 rd hp motor. So these are my ideas if you have any ideas or thoughts let me know. But remember this isn't because I don't want to get a better grinder just have to make mine better till i can afford it. Maybe even help out other guys who just started out.
     
  2. Mike Martinez

    Mike Martinez Well-Known Member

    Here is a video posted by The Count. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qfYT_m2Tw0

    Having started with the same grinder, if I had to to do it over again, the GIB from Polar Bear Forge would be my first choice. Modifying the 2x42 still yields a 2x42 with only two wheels, no contact wheels and very limited attachments. I have less than 950.00 into my grinder with a bunch of attachments and different wheels but my base was only about 625.00 or so.
     
  3. USMC_ROCKO

    USMC_ROCKO Well-Known Member

    But I dont want all the attachments I want a simple grinder without like 4-6 different wheels.
     
  4. Mike Martinez

    Mike Martinez Well-Known Member

    Cool, then a GIB or NWG would be great. If you don't need all the extra stuff, you really don't have to buy it. I bought it cause it saves me time with my projects since its a multi-hobby grinder :D. I use it for making tobacco pipes, knives, an anything else that can hold my interest for a few days. The 2x42 is horribly under powered, crazy fast and limited in its belt options. But since you forge... I think... then it may just work for you.
     
  5. USMC_ROCKO

    USMC_ROCKO Well-Known Member

    I dont forge just stock removal
     
  6. rhinoknives

    rhinoknives Well-Known Member

    Rocko,
    We went through this.
    Get the Coote in 2 x 72' and a 1 1/2 hp motor, Step pulleys and link belt then you will be done with this.
    You can keep the Crapsman 2 x 42 for light work.

    Laurence

    www.rhinoknives.com
     
  7. USMC_ROCKO

    USMC_ROCKO Well-Known Member

    I know we went through this Laurence but I don't get paid that much on my pay checks and need something that will work till then okay.
     
  8. TacticallySharp

    TacticallySharp KNIFE MAKER

    I was given a 2x42 craftmam just after I purchased my 2x72 purer grinder. I had laying around a 110v router speed control form Harbor Freight, I was told using it would burn out the motor sooner, after using for 6 months that way it is still working at a friends shop who is just starting out ( I gave it to him). Did all the basic mods to it also. it may not be the best but, it works with the motor it has. Yes, you can bring it to a stand still. You just need to go slow. Also it's bolted to the bench with a piece of pondo rubber under it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2012
  9. rhinoknives

    rhinoknives Well-Known Member

    Apply for a Sears card and put a new one on it! Your active Military right? They will give you one.
    Make a few knives to pay for it.
    I had one when I started and burned it out in about 3 months. I got one replacement from them and the second time they said I had modified the machine too much and it voided the warranty.

    Laurence

    www.rhinoknives.com
     
  10. Travis Fry

    Travis Fry Well-Known Member

    I appreciate the desire to get started making knives with what you can afford. While I agree that you'll eventually want to upgrade to something better than the craftsman, I disagree that you should spring for something bigger and better right away. If you can afford something better, get it. If not, don't worry too much--get what you can and start making knives. I did my first 100 or so with the 2x42 with very few modifications.

    I'd not worry about making a new contact wheel. I would worry about improving the platen. A simple fix that will make heaps of difference is epoxying a ceramic glass piece to the platen that is already there. Mine is actually modified with a sawn-to-width piece of ceramic shower tile. Ghetto? Maybe, but it worked well and still does. I also cut away part of the guard around the bottom of the wheel so I could use scotchbrite belts, but that's about it. The underpowered part is true, but not a limitation really. The speed IS a limitation, but not an insurmountable one. Your grinds will improve with a better grinder, but you'll be shocked how well you can do without one.

    There are quite a few of us who started with that grinder and lived to tell about it. Don't let the naysayers get you down.
     
  11. jkf96a

    jkf96a Well-Known Member

    Travis is my brother, and I agree with him. I made 200 blades on my craftsman before I finished my NWG. Yes, the criticisms of the craftsman are valid. No, that's no excuse not to get one. Make 15 knives with the craftsman at $100 each and you've got money for a KMG.

    The ceramic tile thing is legit. Toss or cut off most of the guards. I've also profiled inside curves of about 100 knives on my aluminum contact wheel with no damage.
     
  12. USMC_ROCKO

    USMC_ROCKO Well-Known Member

    Okay I will do what i can with it but I am really only wanting to flat grind and I really just want a 2 wheeled grinder what else is out there instead of a coote, grizzly, or a kmg or nwg?
     
  13. jkf96a

    jkf96a Well-Known Member

    Any machine with a platen can do flat grinds. Coote or Grizzly are your two wheeled options. KMG, bader, nwg, EERF, GIB, pheer are all three wheeled designs.
     
  14. USMC_ROCKO

    USMC_ROCKO Well-Known Member

    can the grizzly be modded with a ceramic platen and made better than stock
     
  15. rhinoknives

    rhinoknives Well-Known Member

    Don't waste your money on this single speed machine. For a bit more you can have a step pulley Coote.

    Laurence

    www.rhinoknives.com
     
  16. Travis Fry

    Travis Fry Well-Known Member

    I like and respect Laurence, but I have to disagree, sorta. I agree that the Grizzly isn't worth the extra money you'd spend over a Craftsman, and that neither are as good as even something as basic as a Coote, which is pretty basic. But the last time I checked the Craftsman was $100 or so, and Cootes are more like $600. That isn't just "a bit more." Get the Craftsman now and save for a KMG or similar later.

    I delayed making knives for many many years because I thought I couldn't afford the equipment. Once my brother started making good (actually they were crappy compared to what we both do now, but they were still good to us then) knives on a $100 machine, I realized that I was wrong. I spend about $400 on a machine, belts, steel, materials, even an anvil ($75 for a Peter Wright on craigslist--still proud of that!) and got started. I scrapped 6 of my first 7 attempts. After that I started selling them, priced acording to my place in the market (meaning less than $100) and paid back my equipment and supplies in the first 2 months. I wouldn't have started making knives at all if I'd had to spring for something that cost more than the Craftsman did. I made 100 knives with it, and then got an ancient Bader BII. I reinvested my knife money into my knife hobby, and now have a great knife shop, fully funded by it's own proceeds, with more to come.

    There are faster ways to get a nice knife shop than the careful cashflow management way I took (marrying rich, for example). I've been at this for 3 years, and I still have a long list of stuff to acquire, but it can be done with patience and dedication. Get what you can afford, and build up from there.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
  17. BRad704

    BRad704 Well-Known Member

    I am still working off the Craftsman 2x42, modded to run 72" belts and with a ceramic platen. I think everyone has already stated the obvious limitations of the grinder, but it's been a great little workhorse for me.
     
  18. USMC_ROCKO

    USMC_ROCKO Well-Known Member

    I understand but I mean a grizzly has got to be better than a craftsman.
     
  19. Travis Fry

    Travis Fry Well-Known Member

    They're probably both made in the same Chinese factory. They both run WAY too fast, and both use speed to compensate for power. The only advantage of the Grizz is the fact that you can use 2x72 belts. Flipside, the Craftsman has the advantage that it is also a disc grinder. Even though I have a Bader now, I still use that part of the Craftsman, so it isn't a waste even if you upgrade. And it's a lot cheaper. My opinion (and it's only that) is that while the Grizz may be a bit better, it isn't nearly enough better to justify the extra cost. If you think you're going to spring for the Grizzly, I say go with what Laurence said and get a Coote. Or, with the money you save by not getting the Coote or Grizzly right away, get a used side opening pottery kiln and convert it to digital control. I got mine set up for about $120 after a good craigslist find. If you don't have good temperature control for heat treating, the Craftsman vs. Grizzly debate is pretty moot.
     
  20. Lagrange

    Lagrange Well-Known Member

    I started on a craftsman 2 x 42 and still use it for odds and ends. I wouldnt dump on it because of the price. It will do the job for you. Let you equipment grow with your experience.
     

Share This Page