Chef's knife

Chris Railey

Well-Known Member
#1
I think I am going to make a couple of chef's knives maybe in 8-10 inch range. I have been wanting to do so for a while now but I am wondering what thickness I should start with for a nice middle of the road blade which will slice well but also do some light chopping. The knife will be mainly for prep work, slicing boneless raw meat and vegetables. I have not made many kitchen blades so I would appreciate any advice an experienced kitchen knife person could give. The knife will be high carbon steel more than likely 1080 or 1084 if I can find it thinner than 1/8. Thanks in advance...Chris
 
#2
The thinner the harder the better...Simplistic I know...but I own a ton of kitchen knives and the ones that perform best for what you are describing...is..thinner and harder.

I have not made any kitchen knives...so...grain of salt...lol.
 
#4
Hey Chris,
I finished up a blade for my friend as a wedding gift. Ended up using .187 by 2 inch wide 1095 for a 10 inch Chefs knife. Used Desert Ironwood for the scales. I just did a flat grind down, and the bevels came out great for everyday use.
 

Chris Railey

Well-Known Member
#5
Hey Chris,
I finished up a blade for my friend as a wedding gift. Ended up using .187 by 2 inch wide 1095 for a 10 inch Chefs knife. Used Desert Ironwood for the scales. I just did a flat grind down, and the bevels came out great for everyday use.
Thanks, I actually have some .187 1080 and I was thinking about maybe forging or grinding it down some to make a thinner knife. How did the .187 slice...you did try it didn't you I know I would have had to.
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
#7
I use .110 stock (2 inch width) for chef knives with 6 inch to 10 inch blades. I use primarily AEB-L and .110 thickness is easily found. I start with .110 and do a full distal taper. The spine thickness at the ricasso will be in the .080 or .090 range.

This will give you a knife that is meant for slicing and fast board work. If you want a more European heavy chopper to attack bones and such, then I'd go up to 1/8 thickness.

In this picture from top down:

8 inch chef (.110)
6 inch chef (.110)
7-1/2inch fillet (.070)

Then two slicers. .110 will give you a stiff knife and .070 will give you a knife with flex
 

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Chris Railey

Well-Known Member
#8
I use .110 stock (2 inch width) for chef knives with 6 inch to 10 inch blades. I use primarily AEB-L and .110 thickness is easily found. I start with .110 and do a full distal taper. The spine thickness at the ricasso will be in the .080 or .090 range.

This will give you a knife that is meant for slicing and fast board work. If you want a more European heavy chopper to attack bones and such, then I'd go up to 1/8 thickness.

In this picture from top down:

8 inch chef (.110)
6 inch chef (.110)
7-1/2inch fillet (.070)

Then two slicers. .110 will give you a stiff knife and .070 will give you a knife with flex
I have never used AEB-L how is it when given a simple heat treat?
 

Chris Railey

Well-Known Member
#9
Never mind I did a little research and I think I Will stick with what I know until I get a HT oven. Thanks for telling me though I will give it a try in the future having a stainless option would be good.
 
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