Blade coating

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#1
Hey
I've been considering coating blades recently, mainly to protect none stainless and also for the 'cool' factor, hopefully would help me sell more

Now topics/threads I read contradict, some say duracoat is good, others say powder is better, some say bluing, etc.

Can someone further explain to me? And perhaps someone who tried several can give me his experience?

I am looking for things that can be done on small scale and durability is priority one.

Thanks
 

bodam

Well-Known Member
#2
I'm planning on doing done durocoat and cerakote in the future too.

I've done several pistols and they came out great


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N.N

Well-Known Member
#3
I either force a patina using boiling vinegar or gun blue my personal blades. I've kept my personal blade (1095 w/forced patina) in a leather sheath in my day bag for a while now in Humidity City, Mississippi. "They" say not to store your knife in a leather sheath because it retains moisture, and I live in the capital of sauna country. The patina has kept my blade rust free with no worries. My blued blades have seen no problems either with minimal care. They only thing I do is clean and dry it after every use and after heavy use or maybe once a year (really beating up on it), coat it with Briwax and buff it off. I've found that for a good gun blue finish, you really need to sand or bead blast it before applying. I tried a stonewash on mine before bluing and it worked ok. If you don't do it though, it will be shiney.

I'm of the opinion that a coating like durocoat detracts from one of the best aspects of carbon steel...duracoat won't throw a spark or scratch a ferro rod. It's also hard to reapply if it scratches off. I can touch up a gun blue or patina in 5 minutes and go about my day.
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#4
bodam, i think guns might see less abuse than knives

N.N
can you post photos of your blued knife?
also i thought i needed a smooth finish for bluing and coarser one for duracoat
 

KCorn

Well-Known Member
#5
From what I know I would recommend cerakote. Unbelievably scratch resistant. Much more so than duracoat. Does require baking but can be easily done in your home oven.
 

N.N

Well-Known Member
#8
http://knifedogs.com/showthread.php?37752-Dewcarta-WIP-and-a-few-firsts-for-me

This was the last couple that I blued using birtchwood casey super blue (not perma blue). it's not going to be as durable by far (which you said was #1), but with as easy as it is to touch-up and still retain all it's great properties, I like it better. I would also agree with some that duracoat or ceracote look better...but i'm not worried about what it's going to look like as much as how it performs.
 
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curtisk

Well-Known Member
#10
I have tried duracoat and powder coat and I wasn't impressed with either. I stated using GunKote about four years ago and have found it to be very tough stuff.
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#11
Thanks, from all I heard cerakote and gunkote are the best, but not sure what the difference is
Is gunkote 'tougher'?
 

arock

Well-Known Member
#12
How difficult of a process is using cerakote or gunkote? could you do it with basic things around the shop or do you have to have something special to use these applications?
 

bodam

Well-Known Member
#13
Media blast blade, clean with acetone and spray cerakote mixture. Then bake for 2 hours.

That's the simplified version


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bladegrinder

Well-Known Member
#14
I've tried duracoat and I'm of the opinion that it's not a good coating for working knives. I've heard nothing but good about ceracoat but I haven't tried it yet.
 

J. ROSA

Well-Known Member
#15
I've used cerakote. It's good. Better than the others if applied right but your prep needs to be good and the blade CLEAN. I think a heavy acid etch prior to spraying and baking makes it better because of the texture but I base that off of the way I'd apply it with my lack of a blasting cabinet and suitable air compressor. And yes you can coat and bake without an air compressor if you're careful. I have batch I'm grinding that will get that treatment next month. I did a lot of research on how not to screw this up so I'll let you know how it turns out when it's done.... May take a little bit though...

Currently though I'm still getting my kicks on the acid stonewash. It's a nice finish that is more easily touched up and holds up ok.
 
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SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#16
thanks for the input guys

I also found this yesterday, they do a comparison between cerakote and gunkote. its annoying that its a lot of short clips but I think its worth it
[video=youtube;qA5fhIMGbaU]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qA5fhIMGbaU&list=UU-52uDmagw-IAYROotRhY3w&index=18[/video]

I contacted gun kote to see which of their products would be most suitable for me and will take it from there when they reply
 
#17
Duracoat is not very tough! I thing powder coating is to rough for knives and prevents sliding of the blade. I prefer cerakote. Only the the oven cure series! This coating is really tough, makes a really fine surface for really easy sliding in conjunction with a sharp edge. What bothers me, it is not food safe!

Guncote is similar with cerakote. Cerakote is a little bit tougher, if the advertising tells the truth.


Regards

PiedPiper
 
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SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#18
PiedPiper

according to those videos, gun kote is WAY more durable

so gun kote and cerakot are both not food safe? that sucks!
 

SHOKR

Well-Known Member
#20
The link to the first video (1 out of 18) is in my previous post, you dont see it?

And yeah they do abusive tests to magazines painted with cerakote and gun kote and compare the results
 
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