AEB-L Steel. Anybody made any knives using this steel?

Mapper

Active Member
Hello everyone. I did a search to see if I could find any other post on AEB-L stainless steel and I couldn't find anything so here is my question. I recently ordered this steel from NJ Steel Baron to make some kitchen knives. Has anybody ever used this steel for kitchen knives and how well does it perform? When I received the steel it seems rather soft and of course bends very easily. I know that it is annealed and will be better after proper heat treat and temper but it is way softer feeling than the other steels I have made knives from (1095, O1, 80crV2, 440C). I understand that being kitchen knives I wanted a thin steel so I ordered 1/16" thick and of course that will feel and bend much easier than the 1/8" and 5/32" thick that I make most of my knives out of however, that being said I just wanted to know if anyone had used this steel to make any knives, what they thought of its performance and what you recommended on the Rockwell hardness for a final kitchen blade. Any info. would be greatly appreciated.

John
 

CAJones

Well-Known Member
I've yet to finish a knife in AEB-L, but I have 15 blades that are back from Peter's awaiting my attention. I've heard great things about this steel. Are you sending it out for HT or doing in house? I would think for a kitchen knife you would want to shoot for 61-62 Rockwell.

Hopefully someone much more versed in experience will chime in for you.
Chris
 

A-V

Member
I did about 5 kitchen knives and a machete out of it and it really does a great job for kitchen knives.

At 60.5hrc the machete destroy woods and hasn't chipped from the testing I've done up to now.

Great quality/price ratio really.
 

HHH Knives

Super Moderator
Its a ideal kitchen knife steel. When properly heat treated, I have found it superior to many other stainless steels that cost 2 to 3 times the price of AEBL.

Have fun and stay sharp!
Randy
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
I am also quite pleased with AEB-L for my culinary & B & T/Trail knives. I have the knives done to an RC hardness of 60-61
 

samuraistuart

Well-Known Member
I started using AEB-L this past year (2014), and I LOVE the stuff. What got me hooked on it was this little Kershaw Leek that has 13c26 (Sandvik's version of AEB-L), and how easily that thing took a screaming sharp edge. I ordered some up and made a few kitchen knives. All I have to say is....WOW. I was slightly worried that the edge holding wouldn't be too great under constant use in the kitchen, due to no carbide forming elements. I was wrong. As it turns out, for super edge stability, large and lots of carbides work against you.

Made the wife a santoku and put a 1200 grit edge on it at 30 total. Haven't even needed to touch it up yet. She uses it just about every day. It's been about 4 months. Feels exactly like it did when I sharpened it to begin with.

You will love it! Easy to grind too.....just like carbon steel. Sharpens like carbon steel. But is rust resistant! It's basically a stainless 1080 or 1095, but the edge seems to last longer to me.
 

Mapper

Active Member
Thanks everyone for the information. I was a little worried but these comments have helped my confidence in this steel. I have 3 kitchen knives and 1 wood carving knife ready to send out for HT. I will send them most likely to Peters and based on what I have heard I think I will have them shoot for a 60-61 Rockwell. Again I really appreciate all the great information. I can always depend on this forum for good solid information.

Thanks
John
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
Like Stuart mentioned , the grind ability of AEB-L is adds to the cool factor. Its been call called, the stainless steel for carbon steel lovers or some such?

I'm a stainless lover, and the ease of grinding is like 1080 ish
 
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