3rd slipjoint is done!

KCorn

Well-Known Member
#1
Just finished this slippie today. It’s my third slipjoint but first one to complete with screw together construction. It is in 1095 and G-10. It went fairly smoothly until it came to shortening all of the pivot barrels and screws. If anybody has a way to do that accurately without losing half of your supply I’m all ears!

 

KCorn

Well-Known Member
#6
Thank y’all very much! I don’t think I’ve ever built something that fights back every step of the way like a slipjoint does. Lol! That is strangely addicting. Not sure what that says about me. Does anybody have an easy way to shorten barrels and screws? That was probably the most maddening part of the entire build.
 

BrandantR

Well-Known Member
#7
Hey, that turned out great! Nicely done.

To answer your questions, I use this pivot lap from USA Knifemaker to shorten all of my pivot barrels and bushings: Pivot Lap I insert the pivot or bushing and use a disk grinder or piece of sandpaper on my flat plat to lap the piece down to size.

To shorten screws I have a jig made from a piece of hardened O1 steel ground to the right thickness that has tapped holes through it. In fact I made a new one this last weekend. I do the same thing as with the pivot lap and insert the screws and grind off the ends down flat with the jig. The one I made can trim 3 dozen screws at once. In the beginning I did have one made from a piece of 0.050" titanium with a single hole tapped. I could advance the screw and trim little amounts off until I got the right length.
 

BrandantR

Well-Known Member
#9
220 grit is my go to paper. If I have a lot of material to remove I'll just take it close on my grinder with 50 grit and then finish up lapping with the 220 grit.
 

Don Robinson

Well-Known Member
#11
Hey, that turned out great! Nicely done.

To answer your questions, I use this pivot lap from USA Knifemaker to shorten all of my pivot barrels and bushings: Pivot Lap I insert the pivot or bushing and use a disk grinder or piece of sandpaper on my flat plat to lap the piece down to size.

To shorten screws I have a jig made from a piece of hardened O1 steel ground to the right thickness that has tapped holes through it. In fact I made a new one this last weekend. I do the same thing as with the pivot lap and insert the screws and grind off the ends down flat with the jig. The one I made can trim 3 dozen screws at once. In the beginning I did have one made from a piece of 0.050" titanium with a single hole tapped. I could advance the screw and trim little amounts off until I got the right length.

That's the way I used to do it too.
 

C Craft

Well-Known Member
#12
Hey, that turned out great! Nicely done.

To answer your questions, I use this pivot lap from USA Knifemaker to shorten all of my pivot barrels and bushings: Pivot Lap I insert the pivot or bushing and use a disk grinder or piece of sandpaper on my flat plat to lap the piece down to size.

To shorten screws I have a jig made from a piece of hardened O1 steel ground to the right thickness that has tapped holes through it. In fact I made a new one this last weekend. I do the same thing as with the pivot lap and insert the screws and grind off the ends down flat with the jig. The one I made can trim 3 dozen screws at once. In the beginning I did have one made from a piece of 0.050" titanium with a single hole tapped. I could advance the screw and trim little amounts off until I got the right length.
Brandant, would you mind showing some pictures of what you are speaking off. Some of us have to visual aids!!!
Seriously I would like to see your set-up!!
 

BrandantR

Well-Known Member
#13
Brandant, would you mind showing some pictures of what you are speaking off. Some of us have to visual aids!!!
Seriously I would like to see your set-up!!
Cliff, here's another link to the pivot lap: https://usaknifemaker.com/pivot-lap-basic-knifedogs-3-bushing-model.html
And here's a pic of my old screw length jig. I don't have any pics of the new one, but it's build much like this one. I also polish the screw heads while they are still fastened into the jig. Makes things convenient.
WP_20180303_12_35_57_Pro.jpg
 

KCorn

Well-Known Member
#14
Top