1095 Quenching

Freeman Longhunter

Active Member
Hello all, I am new to knife making but I have always noticed that 1095 will blister during the quenching process. I am curious as to why. Several other carbon steels and that I have worked with do not.
I am careful not to overheat and my quenching media is an olive oil preheated to about 100 F. Any insight into this would be much appreciated. I have learned more from a ten minute stroll through this forum than I have in the last year on my own. You guys are a cornucopia for a budding knifemaker. Thanks all!
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
It's hard to tell without pictures or further info but blistering sure sounds like overheating to me. Again, not saying it is but that's typically right in line with getting it too hot.

What is your heat source and how are you monitoring it?
 

LRB

Well-Known Member
I agree, sounds like over heating or heating for too long.
 
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Freeman Longhunter

Active Member
I use a "Wayne Goddard" forge, but I only forge under low light where I can really monitor the color while constantly checking with a magnet. The knives temper fine and all pass the rod test with flying colors. Maybe I am soaking for too long. Pic to follow.
 

taylormadeknives

Well-Known Member
I might go out on a limb and say it's your quench. Not sure how fast warmed olive oil is, but I do know that 1095 needs a very fast quench. I would recommend Parks 50 for 1095. If you insist on using your olive oil, switch to 1080 or 1084. Much easier and doesn't require a soak time or a fast quench. 5160 would be even better for your set up. Just my 2 cents
 

aelgin

Well-Known Member
When you quench do you get a lot of vapor bubbles around the blade? I use canola oil for mine and found that at 100 degrees I wasn't quenching fast enough because the vapor bubbles. I do my canola at 130-140 and it seems to work well for me.

-Aaron
 

Freeman Longhunter

Active Member
I do get vapor bubbles. I will switch to canola and heat to the higher temp you suggested. I think I may order some parks 50 and give that a try too. I am flexible to change as long as it means I am doing things correctly and producing a quality tool. Hey thanks fellas.....much appreciated!
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
You absolutely won't be sorry if you order some Parks 50. You'll wonder why you didn't do it sooner.

You will improve your blades in several aspects if you want to stick with steels that require a fast quench.
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
Yeah, I second that. It's not really that parks 50 WON'T work for those steels.......more likely you're taking unnecessary risks with micro cracking due to too much strain put on the steel from an unnecessarily fast quench. Blades of 5160 and O1 *could* survive a Parks 50 quench.

P-50 is FANTASTIC for w2, w1, 1095, 1075, 1084 and 1080.....any steel that is shallow hardening and requires a fast quench.
 

aelgin

Well-Known Member
I think i need to buy some parks as well. Do you need to preheat parks 50 like you do canola oil on 1095? If so is there an ideal temp I should shoot for?

Thanks
-Aaron
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
Aaron preheating it is recommended. About 90-110 F. is the sweet spot for me. Remember parks has a low flashpoint compared to some oils so you don't want to overheat it.
 
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