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  1. Kevin R. Cashen

    Historically Speaking, When ...,

    Two huge factors were firearms taking the dominant role on the battlefield and the industrial revolution. At the same time that you see bladed weapons going very utilitarian and more like cheap trinkets, you see firearms getting all that attention in the way of embellishment and improvement...
  2. Kevin R. Cashen

    Have I got this right???

    What he said....;)
  3. Kevin R. Cashen

    Historically Speaking, When ...,

    Can’t say anything for certain, but plunge lines were at least necessitated by the advent of the ricasso. The ricasso was ushered in by two factors- fighting styles that brought the fingers more often in front of the guard to control the blade and steel production technologies that allowed for...
  4. Kevin R. Cashen

    Last weeks European Quillon Dagger class at the SOFA ABS school in Troy, OH

    Last week I taught a specialized European Quillon Dagger class at the SOFA ABS school in Troy Ohio. The weather was great, especially compared to what I left in Michigan. This class focuses on the dagger as an actual historical artifact with emphasis on classic function and design, a total...
  5. Kevin R. Cashen

    Question on 52100

    Chromium has a much higher affinity with carbon than iron does, this has an effect on diffusive processes, thus you get deeper hardening due to the suppression of pearlite formation. 1095 loves to make pearlite with proeutectoid carbide sheets, it really needs to be coaxed to ball that carbide...
  6. Kevin R. Cashen

    52100 steel

    Hello Doug, Rather than clutter up the knife steel reference pages with my technobabble, if you would like to do a private message or discuss it in the Heat Treatment forum I would be happy to explain it better.
  7. Kevin R. Cashen

    52100 steel

    I am currently up to my elbows in 52100 lab testing and study. I have dozens of samples of various heat treatments mounted for polish and I need to go out to the shop yet today and prep a dozen more on which the mounting should be fully hardened. My first DVD was 1080/1084 and with 52100 I...
  8. Kevin R. Cashen

    Top three mistakes rookies make,,,

    Thank you, Chris. What Chris said about a certain item automatically equaling a certain alloy is very much my position as well, and this situation is only getting more true as time goes on and manufacturers find more cost effective ways of producing those items. But it goes so far beyond this...
  9. Kevin R. Cashen

    Top three mistakes rookies make,,,

    Thanks for the kind words Gene, for both of those sites, as my responsbilities to the ABS forum increase I am having a harder time telling one from the other. As for my vote for the number one mistake, and I may sound like a broken record, but I have learned from my mistakes and many other...
  10. Kevin R. Cashen

    Parks 50

    Oh heck, since I have inserted myself in the discussion now (sorry, I don't mean to hog the bandwidth), about that canola... Canola is a fairly fast quenching oil, but these are the advantages of springing for the engineered quenchant- Canola can come close to the #50 in the upper range of the...
  11. Kevin R. Cashen

    Parks 50

    Hmmm, I hope I don't step on too many toes here, but I would like to give a little input on a few bits of info here. What I am putting forth will only be what is recommended by the manufacturers, industry and what I have confirmed with years of experience and testing in my own shop. I have seen...
  12. Kevin R. Cashen

    Normalizing damascus

    The pattern accentuation is due to oxidation. The different alloys oxidize at different rates when heated. It is best to completely remove this effect if you are going to etch the damascus as the oxides and decarb will make a mess of the etch. If you are just going for topography and want...
  13. Kevin R. Cashen

    Question on this Quenchant

    That one would be a very good match for 80CrV2.
  14. Kevin R. Cashen

    I have a moral/ethical question on forging.

    Ah yes, I see what you mean that is some nasty alloy banding. Under the microscope you would see those lines as being large collections of primary spheroidal carbides. For this you could try a high hardening heat, immediately followed by a more reasonable one (cooling in between, of course)...
  15. Kevin R. Cashen

    Question on this Quenchant

    It may be a bit fast for 80CrV2, but not as mismatched as Parks #50. If you will be working primarily with 80CrV2, an 11 to 14 second oil would be better.
  16. Kevin R. Cashen

    Question on this Quenchant

    It should be a faster oil than most, but just a hair slower than Parks #50. Viscosity is very similar. This oils maximum rate is 147, Parks 50 is 198.9. The top half of the curve, through Ar1 (the pearlite transition zone) it is about 1.2 seconds slower than Parks. At the bottom of the curve...
  17. Kevin R. Cashen

    I have a moral/ethical question on forging.

    Well, we need to remember that in a stainless alloy normalizing, i.e. heat to full solution and air cooling, is no longer normalizing, as it is technically hardening. And not a very good hardening at that, as full solution is usually not a good idea for hardening if it will result in...
  18. Kevin R. Cashen

    I have a moral/ethical question on forging.

    Only if there are conditions that can be improved by it. Heavy carbide segregations is one case where the answer would be yes, but just one or two good normalizations should do the trick. This is the case where heavily spheroidized steel has a hard time reaching full hardness but after one...
  19. Kevin R. Cashen

    I have a moral/ethical question on forging.

    Well, it would probably be much more accurate to say that I could rival a research company's lab from about 30 years ago. I am just a bladesmith and am no where near wealthy enough to afford any of the equipment that you would find in a modern lab. So I have gotten good at finding, and...
  20. Kevin R. Cashen

    I have a moral/ethical question on forging.

    The steel supply condition is such a big topic that is could easily hijack this thread, so I will be as brief as possible here. Some things are not a flaw in the steel but rather processing that makes it more particular in how we treat it, but other issues are a matter of knowing what we really...
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