Welcome to KnifeDogs


A Family Friendly Knife Oriented Community Founded For Knifemakers, Collectors, & Enthusiasts.


  •  » Forums for individual knife dealers.
  •  » Forums for businesses supporting the knife industry.
  •  » Knife makers individual forums for visiting, support and sales.
  •  » Forums for knives.

...then you have come to the right place!


we will try to help you with your problem.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Atlas Mini Forge

  1. #1

    Atlas Mini Forge

    I have been considering getting one of the Atlas Mini Forges. I am only doing stock removal and use the Forge to harden the blades. Eventually I will move into Forging blades but I want to concentrate on getting my knives up to par before adding additional variables. The one brick forge I made worked GREAT but I want to make some larger knives and the brick wont handle it. Plus I want to move to a real burner and use a 20LB propane tank instead of the small ones. These look like a good product and seem to have gotten good reviews? Anyone own our use one of them can help a total novice out??

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Great Falls, Montana, USA
    Posts
    2,818
    As with most things related to knifemaking, the view of a product is going to depend on one's experience/knowledge. That being said, I have worked with most of the Atlas forges, and based on the fact that I've had many years experience with using and building forges, I would rate the Atlas mini as a soft "OK" as a starter forge. It's obvious to me that the Atlas forges are designed and built in order to keep the cost down, yet maintain a profit margin, which is necessary if one is building forges for sale.

    There are a number of things that I would personally do differently, in order to make the forges "optimum" for use, mainly re-positioning the burner holder to reduce/minimize the "hot spot" that seems to be present in all of them. Most who are just starting out with a forge would likely encounter some issues, but over time/experience, would likely learn to deal with the issues. Many beginners find them attractive because of the price, but I think it bears mentioning that the price listed for the Mini Forge is without a burner....so consider that additional cost when making your decision. I would NOT purchase the "Budget" forge, simply because of the corners that were cut to make it a "Budget" model. (burner placement/angle, and liner type),

    My final recommendation is to go larger, both in the forge size and the burner size then what you THINK you need. You can always "dial down" a larger forge/burner, but once you reach the max output of a smaller model, there's nothing you can do to increase it's output.


    www.caffreyknives.net
    Caffreyknives@Gmail.com

    "Nobody cares what you know.....until they know you care."
    Visit me at Table 2Q at the Blade Show!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    1,369
    Quote Originally Posted by Gliden07 View Post
    I have been considering getting one of the Atlas Mini Forges. I am only doing stock removal and use the Forge to harden the blades. Eventually I will move into Forging blades but I want to concentrate on getting my knives up to par before adding additional variables. The one brick forge I made worked GREAT but I want to make some larger knives and the brick wont handle it. Plus I want to move to a real burner and use a 20LB propane tank instead of the small ones. These look like a good product and seem to have gotten good reviews? Anyone own our use one of them can help a total novice out??

    Thanks
    Ed's advice is golden.

    I have an Atlas forge, and pretty much use it exactly like you outlined. I'm a stock removal guy and I need a forge for the rare times when I need to heat treat carbon steel. In other words, it sits on a shelf 99% of the time, but when I need a forge I have it.

    It's handy. It's very small. I got it used for half the price of a new one. Those three criteria make it great for me because I use it about as often as I need a great big set of channel locks. I got one of those too...somewhere.

    If I was going to do carbon steel regularly or begin forging regularly, the first thing I'd do is build a bigger forge.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by John Wilson View Post
    Ed's advice is golden.

    I have an Atlas forge, and pretty much use it exactly like you outlined. I'm a stock removal guy and I need a forge for the rare times when I need to heat treat carbon steel. In other words, it sits on a shelf 99% of the time, but when I need a forge I have it.

    It's handy. It's very small. I got it used for half the price of a new one. Those three criteria make it great for me because I use it about as often as I need a great big set of channel locks. I got one of those too...somewhere.

    If I was going to do carbon steel regularly or begin forging regularly, the first thing I'd do is build a bigger forge.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Wanna sell it for half of what you paid for it??

    I think I will mess around with my own design till I can afford a real forge! I live near a place that sells the light weight refractory bricks so I think I may play a little with them. Without the shipping and packaging there reasonable. Thanks for your help gents its much appreciated!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    1,369
    For a quickie forge, fire bricks and a torch work fine. In the long run it's more expensive, but if you're talking a knife here and a knife there then the cost difference balances out.

    check out Gough Customs on Youtube. He has great videos showing how it can be done with just a couple of bricks and a torch.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by John Wilson View Post
    For a quickie forge, fire bricks and a torch work fine. In the long run it's more expensive, but if you're talking a knife here and a knife there then the cost difference balances out.

    check out Gough Customs on Youtube. He has great videos showing how it can be done with just a couple of bricks and a torch.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yes!! I love Arron Goughs channel!! Already subscribed and built one of the filing jigs!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •