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Thread: Serrated vs. un-serrated contact wheel?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Northern utah
    Posts
    47

    Serrated vs. un-serrated contact wheel?

    I'm adding to my grinder accessory collection, and I'm looking to add a contact wheel or two. What are the advantages and disadvantages of serrated vs. non? Also, what's a good starting size, assuming I'll add others in the future? 2x72 grinder based on the NWG platform.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Great Falls, Montana, USA
    Posts
    2,820
    Smooth contact wheels remove material at a slower rate, but leave a better finish.... Serrated wheels remove material faster then smooth wheels, but leave a rougher finish.



    A good starting size is dependent on the uses you're intending it for..... the industry standard for grinder packages is 8". That size if fine is you're using the wheel for profiling. Most Knifemakers tend to think of 10" as the "standard" if you're hollow grinding.

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Plainville, MA.
    Posts
    2,435
    For hollow grinds :
    An 8" serrated gets there quick full speed, both profiling and cutting in the initial bevels. After Ht, I use the 10" or bigger smooth wheel for the finish grinds. The smooth wheel seems to like a medium speed with lighter pressure. The smooth wheel seems to want to jump up and over your flats or spine at a certain point if you're not paying attention...it's a 'feel' thing. It's most likely due to contact with more surface area and pressure. I do this free hand and don't know if it would be any better with any of the grinding gizmos. Watch out for belt bump with the higher grits on a smooth wheel, the micron belts don't seem to like it.

    Rudy

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