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Thread: Pictures of my mistakes/knives

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Alpine NY
    Posts
    409

    Pictures of my mistakes/knives

    These are a couple of my knife mistakes the one with the holes in the handle is done with a jig the other is free hand both are messed up on one side wats your best guess wat my problem is.

    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    North central montana
    Posts
    650
    I'm pretty new to grinding...but I notice that when my blade is pointing left I grind much easier. when pointing right...much harder to do. I think it might be a left-hand/right-hand thing? I grind with the edge up so I can see my split line.

    Do you notice something similar?
    Thanks,
    Smallshop (AKA Ted Hauser)


    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    God puts the iron in the ground and the highlights in the wood....it's His stuff, we just get to work with it....make it nice.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Alpine NY
    Posts
    409
    Yes I do!

  4. #4
    What size grinder are you using? That's not all bad for a first time. Get some mild steel to practice with and get to know your grinder better. That way your not wasting the good stuff. practice practice

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,170
    My best guess is that you are inexperienced at grinding and knife making in general.

    Every maker wants to make a perfect knife. Very few ever accomplish that goal. If any maker ever does accomplish the perfect knife? Ever! I'm still waiting to see my very first perfect knife. Mine or otherwise.

    A lot of newer makers accomplish what you have pictured. Myself included. I have a pile of messed up knives. Every maker probably has a pile of messed up knives.

    Newer makers/inexperienced makers start a knife and then quit when they think it is messed up. Or they really do mess it up so badly, it cannot ever be fixed. Then they question themselves, usually over and over without ever getting an acceptable answer to the most simple question. What am I doing wrong???

    They start again, and again quit when it gets messed up. So on, and so on, and so on.

    Part of making knives is figuring out how to fix a mess up. Good makers learn to overcome their own mess ups. The more you practice the better you will become. It is inevitable. Just keep grinding.

    I have noticed that in the last few years some of the newer makers are cranking out some killer stuff. There are a lot of reasons for this, but, I think mostly it is easier access to knife knowledge. The internet allows newer makers to gain knowledge at a much faster rate. You tube, how to's, Knife dogs, direct access to experienced makers, etc. It speeds up the learning curve.

    With gathered experience, you eventually learn to avoid messing up in the first place. You will perfect your technique and gain more wisdom. This will make you an even better maker.

    A very wise maker once told me - start your next knife and refuse to quit on it. If you screw up, fix it. Learn from your mistakes but finish the knife. Then start again on a new knife with the wisdom that you gained. Your screw ups will become less and less noticeable and less and less frequent as you continue to finish each knife. Eventually, you can begin to call yourself a knife maker and your end product will get better and better.

    For me, this wisdom comes into play every day that I am in the shop. I have learned a great deal. Off the internet and by trial and error. I have a long ways to go. I think I am getting better at knife making. I enjoy the learning process as much as the end product.

    You will get better, keep practicing.

    DeMo

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Alpine NY
    Posts
    409
    Thanx Demo! I plan on getting some of that cheap steel soon!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Great Falls, Montana, USA
    Posts
    2,785
    Part of making knives is figuring out how to fix a mess up. Good makers learn to overcome their own mess ups. The more you practice the better you will become. It is inevitable. Just keep grinding.
    VERY WELL said.

    Something I tell my students..... The difference between a "knifemaker" and a "good knifemaker" is that the "good knifemaker" has learned how to correct or hide his/her mistakes.

    It's a constant and ever present part of what we do (fixing or hiding mistakes). If ANY knifemaker says they can grind 2 out of 5 blades without having to make corrections, then they're better then average. Anyone who says they can grind 4 out of 5 without making corrections.... is probably a liar.

    www.caffreyknives.net
    Caffreyknives@Gmail.com

    "Nobody cares what you know.....until they know you care."
    Visit me at Table 2Q at the Blade Show!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Alpine NY
    Posts
    409
    Good words Demo thank you and I didn't give up on the blade until it was too thin to continue.I knew it would never be right but was trying too figure out wat I was doing wrong.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Billings MT
    Posts
    312
    I can't give you any advice on grinding. It is something that I still struggle with. It does get easy as you go. Do you mean to thin on the edge or the whole blade is to thin? If it's the edge you can just grind the profile back. You would be surprised at how little material you have to remove before it gets thicker. If anything use those to test out different heat treats. Then abuse the daylights out of them. DeMo gave some of the best advice I have heard about new makers learning this trade.
    Ty Adams
    Instagram @tyadamsknives

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Alpine NY
    Posts
    409
    Thats a good idea!

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